dictum
dic·tum /'dik-təm/ n pl dic·ta /-tə/ [Latin, utterance, from neuter of dictus, past participle of dicere to say]: a view expressed by a judge in an opinion on a point not necessarily arising from or involved in a case or necessary for determining the rights of the parties involved – called also obiter dictum; compare holding, judgment, precedent, stare decisis
◇ Dicta have persuasive value in making an argument, but they are not binding as precedent.

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

dictum
I noun announcement, assertion, authoritative assertion, declaration, extrajudicial opinion, finding, gratuitous remark, illustrative statement, incidental opinion, judicial assertion, judicial comment, judicial remark, observation, opinion, pronouncement, recommendation, remark, statement, statement by way of illustration associated concepts: judicial dictum, obiter dictum II index canon, comment III index declaration IV index dogma, law V index observation VI index phrase, pronouncement VII index remark VIII index statement

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


dictum
n.
A statement or observation made by a judge about a case that is not an official part of a judicial opinion, does not embody the court’s decision, and is not binding.
pl.
dicta

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


dictum

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


dictum
A remark, statement, or observation of a judge that is not a necessary part of the legal reasoning needed to reach the decision in a case. Although dictum may be cited in a legal argument, it is not binding as legal precedent, meaning that other courts are not required to accept it. Dictum is an abbreviation of the Latin phrase "obiter dictum," which means a remark by the way, or an aside.
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Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


dictum
n. In a court's decision, a statement of opinion or of a general rule that is explanatory or suggestive only, and not binding on courts in future cases, because it does not form part of the court's central argument. For example, a judge's suggestion as to how she might decide a related controversy not presently before her would be considered dictum.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


dictum
(Latin: A remark.)
A statement, comment, or opinion. An abbreviated version of obiter dictum, "a remark by the way," which is a collateral opinion stated by a judge in the decision of a case concerning legal matters that do not directly involve the facts or affect the outcome of the case, such as a legal principle that is introduced by way of illustration, argument, analogy, or suggestion.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


dictum
I
[Latin, A remark.] A statement, comment, or opinion. An abbreviated version of obiter dictum, "a remark by the way," which is a collateral opinion stated by a judge in the decision of a case concerning legal matters that do not directly involve the facts or affect the outcome of the case, such as a legal principle that is introduced by way of illustration, argument, analogy, or suggestion.
II (Pl. dicta) A decision; a judicial opinion on a point of law.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

dictum
n.
   Latin for "remark," a comment by a judge in a decision or ruling which is not required to reach the decision, but may state a related legal principle as the judge understands it. While it may be cited in legal argument, it does not have the full force of a precedent (previous court decisions or interpretations) since the comment was not part of the legal basis for judgment. The standard counter argument is: "it is only dictum (or dicta)."
   See also: dicta, obiter dicta

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Dictum — (lat.), 1) Spruch, Ausspruch, Bonmot, Sprüchwort; 2) Grundsatz; so: Dictum de omni (D. de exemplo) et nullo (D. de diverso), logischer Grundsatz, der vollständig so lautet: Was der Gattung zukommt od. widerspricht, kommt zu od. widerspricht auch… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Dictum — (latin, Flertal dicia), udsagn, ord; dictum biblicum, bibelsprog; dictum classicum, hovedsted, vigtigste udtalelse om en ting; dicta probantia, bevissteder (især bibelske); dicta septem sapientium, de 7 vises ord; dictus, nævnt, ovennævnt; dicto… …   Danske encyklopædi

  • dictum — ⇒DICTUM, subst. masc. Vx. ,,Dispositif d un jugement, d un arrêt; cette partie d un jugement, d un arrêt qui contient ce que le juge prononce et ordonne (Ac. 1798 1878).Le dictum d une sentence, d un arrêt (Ac. 1798 1878). Rem. Ac. 1878 note que… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • dictum — DICTUM. s. m. Mot emprunté du Latin. Le dispositif d une Sentence, d un Arrêt, cette partie d une Sentence ou d un Arrêt qui contient ce que le Juge prononce et ordonne. Le dictum d une Sentence, d un Arrêt …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • dictum — (n.) 1660s, from L. dictum thing said (a saying, bon mot, prophecy, etc.), an order, command, neuter of dictus, pp. of dicere say (see DICTION (Cf. diction)). In legal use, a judge s expression of opinion which is not the formal resolution of a… …   Etymology dictionary

  • dictum — [n1] saying; proverb adage, aphorism, apothegm, axiom, brocard, gnome, maxim, moral, motto, precept, rule, saw, truism; concepts 278,689 dictum [n2] decree, pronouncement affirmation, assertion, command, declaration, dictate, edict, fiat, order;… …   New thesaurus

  • dictum — Dictum. s. m. Dispositif, cette partie d une sentence ou d un arrest, qui contient ce que le Juge prononce & ordonne. Le dictum d une sentence, d un arrest …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Dictum — Dic tum, n.; pl. L. {Dicta}, E. {Dictums}. [L., neuter of dictus, p. p. of dicere to say. See {Diction}, and cf. {Ditto}.] 1. An authoritative statement; a dogmatic saying; an apothegm. [1913 Webster] A class of critical dicta everywhere current …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dictum — (lat., Mehrzahl dicta), Spruch, Ausspruch, Wort; d. biblicum, Bibelspruch; d. classicum, Hauptstelle, Hauptspruch; dicta probantia, Beweissprüche, Beweisstellen, besonders biblische, worauf sich ein Glaubenssatz gründet, oder woraus er… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Dictum — (lat.), Spruch, Ausspruch, Sprichwort …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

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