dismiss
dis·miss vt
1: to remove from position or service
dismiss ed the employee
2: to bring about or order the dismissal of (an action)
the suit was dismiss ed
vi: to bring about or order a dismissal
the plaintiff moved to dismiss

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

dismiss
I (discharge) verb cashier, cast out, demobilize, depose, deprive of force, disemploy, dispatch, dispense with, displace, dispossess, eject, expel, fire, lay off, oust, purge, release, remove, remove from office, send away, send off, set free, suspend, turn away, turn out, unseat, vacate associated concepts: dismiss a cause of action, dismissal because of laches, dismissed for cause, dismissed with prejudice, dismissed without prejudice, motion to dismiss, motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim, motion to dismiss for lack of jurisdiction, nonsuit II (put out of consideration) verb brush aside, decline, deny, disallow, disavow, discountenance, disregard, ignore, lay aside, not hear of, pass over, pay no regard to, put out of mind, refuse, reject, rule out, set aside, take no notice, think no more of III index cancel, cede, clear, condone, controvert, decry, deport (banish), depose (remove), disband, discharge (release from obligation), discontinue (abandon), dislodge, dispel, displace (remove), disregard, eject (expel), eliminate (exclude), except (exclude), exclude, exculpate, expel, forgo, free, liberate, oust, override, quash, rebuff, recall (call back), refuse, reject, release, relegate, relinquish, remit (release from penalty), remove (dismiss from office), renounce, rescind, revoke, send, superannuate, supplant, vindicate, waive

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


dismiss
v.
(1) To allow to leave or to send away.
(2) To terminate someone’s employment.
(3) For a judge to refuse to consider a lawsuit further, thereby ending it before a trial is completed.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


dismiss
(1) In a court setting, a judge may dismiss or throw out all or a portion of a plaintiff's lawsuit without further evidence or testimony upon being persuaded that the plaintiff has not and cannot prove the case. This judgment may be made before or at anytime during the trial. The judge may independently decide to dismiss or may do so in response to a motion by the defendant. Also, the plaintiff may voluntarily dismiss an action before or during trial if the case is settled, if it is not provable, or if trial strategy dictates getting rid of a weak claim. A defendant may also be dismissed from a lawsuit, meaning the suit is dropped against that party. (2) To discharge or let an employee go.
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

dismiss
v.
   the ruling by a judge that all or a portion (one or more of the causes of action) of the plaintiff's lawsuit is terminated (thrown out) at that point without further evidence or testimony. This judgment may be made before, during or at the end of a trial, when the judge becomes convinced that the plaintiff has not and cannot prove his/her/its case. This can be based on the complaint failing to allege a cause of action, on a motion for summary judgment, plaintiff's opening statement of what will be proved, or on some development in the evidence by either side which bars judgment for the plaintiff. The judge may dismiss on his own or upon motion by the defendant. The plaintiff may voluntarily dismiss a cause of action before or during trial if the case is settled, if it is not provable or trial strategy dictates getting rid of a weak claim. A defendant may be "dismissed" from a lawsuit, meaning the suit is dropped against that party.
   See also: dismissal

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • dismiss — dis‧miss [dɪsˈmɪs] verb [transitive] 1. HUMAN RESOURCES to remove someone from their job, usually because they have done something wrong: • He was dismissed from his job at a bank for repeatedly turning up to work late. 2. LAW to state officially …   Financial and business terms

  • dismiss — 1 Dismiss, discharge, cashier, drop, sack, fire, bounce are comparable when they mean to let go from one s employ or service. Dismiss basically denotes a giving permission to go {he dismissed the assembly Acts 19:41} {dismissed the night watchers …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Dismiss — Dis*miss , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dismissed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dismissing}.] [L. dis + missus, p. p. of mittere to send: cf. dimittere, OF. desmetre, F. d[ e]mettre. See {Demise}, and cf. {Dimit}.] 1. To send away; to give leave of departure; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dismiss — [v1] send away, remove; free abolish, banish, boot*, brush off*, bundle, cast off*, cast out*, chase, chuck, clear, decline, deport, detach, disband, discard, dispatch, dispense with, disperse, dispose of, dissolve, divorce, do without, drive out …   New thesaurus

  • dismiss — [dis mis′] vt. [ME dismissen < ML dismissus, pp. of dismittere, for L dimittere, to send away < dis , from + mittere, to send: see MISSION] 1. to send away; cause or allow to leave 2. to remove or discharge from a duty, office, position, or …   English World dictionary

  • Dismiss — Dis*miss , n. Dismission. [Obs.] Sir T. Herbert. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dismiss — early 15c., from L. dimissus, pp. of dimittere send away, send different ways; break up, discharge; renounce, abandon, from dis apart, away (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + mittere send, let go (see MISSION (Cf. mission)). Prefix altered by analogy with… …   Etymology dictionary

  • dismiss — ► VERB 1) order or allow to leave; send away. 2) discharge from employment. 3) regard as unworthy of consideration. 4) Law refuse further hearing to (a case). 5) Cricket end the innings of (a batsman or side). DERIVATIVES dismissal noun …   English terms dictionary

  • dismiss — v. 1) to dismiss curtly, summarily; lightly 2) (D; tr.) to dismiss as (he was dismissed as incompetent) 3) (D; tr.) to dismiss for (I was dismissed for being late) 4) (D; tr.) to dismiss from (he was dismissed from his job) 5) (misc.) (BE;… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • dismiss */*/ — UK [dɪsˈmɪs] / US verb [transitive] Word forms dismiss : present tense I/you/we/they dismiss he/she/it dismisses present participle dismissing past tense dismissed past participle dismissed 1) to refuse to accept that something might be true or… …   English dictionary

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