estate
es·tate /i-'stāt/ n [Anglo-French estat, literally, state, condition, from Old French, from Latin status, from stare to stand]
1: the interest of a particular degree, nature, quality, or extent that one has in land or other property compare fee; future interest at interest, remainder, reversion, tenancy
absolute estate: an estate that confers an absolute right to property and that is subject to no limitations, restrictions, or conditions: fee simple absolute at fee simple
contingent estate: an estate whose vesting is conditioned upon the happening or failure of some uncertain event
equitable estate: the estate of one that has a beneficial right to property which is legally owned by a trustee or a person regarded at equity as a trustee (as in the case of a use or power) compare legal estate in this entry
estate at sufferance: the estate in property held by one who remains in possession of or on the property after his or her lawful right to do so has ended
estate at will: an estate in property subject to termination at the will of another person
estate by the entirety: an estate held by a husband and wife together in which the whole property belongs to each of them and passes as a whole to the survivor upon the death of either of them to the exclusion of the deceased spouse's heirs – called also estate by the entireties;; compare joint tenancy tenancy by the entirety, and tenancy in common at tenancy
estate for years: an estate that terminates after a set period
estate in expectancy: an estate the enjoyment of which will take place at a future time: future interest at interest
estate of inheritance: an estate that can be inherited (as a fee simple as opposed to a life estate)
estate on condition: an estate subject to a contingency whose happening permits the grantor of the estate to terminate it if he or she so chooses compare fee simple determinable at fee simple
estate pur autre vie: a life estate measured by the life of a third person rather than that of the person enjoying the property
estate tail pl estates tail: an estate granted to a person and his or her direct descendants subject to a reverter or remainder upon the inheritance of the property by a grantee without direct descendants: fee tail at fee
legal estate: an estate to which one person (as a trustee) has legal title but of which another person has the right to the beneficial use compare equitable estate in this entry
life estate: an estate in property held only during or measured in duration by the lifetime of a specified individual and esp. the individual enjoying the property see also life tenant
◇ Life estates are not estates of inheritance.
vested estate: an estate in which one has a right to enjoyment currently or sometime in the future
2: all or designated items of a person's or entity's property considered as a whole
bankruptcy estate: the estate of a debtor in bankruptcy that includes all the debtor's legal and equitable interests in property as set out in the bankruptcy laws – called also debtor's estate; see also bankruptcy, trustee in bankruptcy
per·son·al estate: all of a person's property except real property; broadly: all of the property belonging to a person
sep·ar·ate estate: an estate whose ownership and control is enjoyed by a person free from any rights or control of another (as a spouse)
3 a: the assets and liabilities left by a person at death see also bequest, devise, freehold, heir, inheritance, intestate, leasehold, legacy, probate, testate, will
aug·ment·ed estate /ȯg-'men-təd-/: a deceased person's probate estate increased in accordance with statutory provisions and esp. by the addition of any property transferred by the deceased within two years of death, any joint tenancies, and any transfers in which the deceased retained either the right to revoke or the income for life
◇ In some states, the surviving spouse's elective share is distributed from the augmented estate.
gross estate: the estate of a person upon death defined by federal estate laws to include all of the deceased's real and personal property at death that may be passed by will or by intestate succession as well as specified property transferred by the deceased before death
probate estate: all of a deceased person's estate that is administered under the jurisdiction of the probate court
◇ Some assets, such as certain insurance proceeds, generally do not become part of the probate estate and are said to “pass outside of probate.”
residuary estate: all of what is left of an estate once the deceased person's debts and administration costs have been paid and all specific and general bequests and devises have been distributed – called also residual estate;
taxable estate: the estate of a deceased person that is subject to estate tax
◇ Under federal estate tax law, the taxable estate is the gross estate less allowed deductions.
b: the aggregate of a deceased person's property considered as a legal entity
4: a tract of land esp. affected by an easement
dominant estate: a tract of land that is benefited by an easement burdening a servient estate
servient estate: a tract of land that is burdened by an easement benefiting a dominant estate

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

estate
I (hereditament) noun bequest, birthright, devise, gift by succession, heritage, heritance, inheritance, legacy, patrimony associated concepts: beneficial estate, charge against an estate, claim against an estate, distribution, estate tax, residue II (property) noun acres, ager, assets, assets and liabilities, belongings, chattels, chattels real, chose in action, collective assets, earthly possessions, effects, equity, freehold, goods, grounds, hereditament, holdings, intangible assets, interest in land, land and buildings, lands, liquid assets, material assets, material things which are owned, personalty, piece of landed property, possessio, possessions, real estate, realty, resources, right, title and interest in land, tangible assets, tangibles, tenement, territory, valuables, villa associated concepts: absolute estate, conditional estate, defeasible estate, equitable estate, estate at sufferance, estate at will, estate by entirety, estate by purchase, estate for life, estate for years, estate from period to period, estate from year to year, estate in common, estate in expectancy, estate in land, estate in remainder, estate in reversion, estate lands, estate on a conditional limitation, estate pour autre vie, estate tail, estate upon a limitation, executory estate, fee-simple estate, fee-tail estate, forfeiture of an estate, freehold, joint estate, landed estate, life estate, limited estate, next eventual estate, qualified estate, vested estate foreign phrases:
- Post executionem status lex non patitur possibilitatem. — After the execution of the estate the law suffers not a possibility
III index assets, demesne, domain (land owned), dower, effects, freehold, holding (property owned), homestead, paraphernalia (personal belongings), parcel, possessions, property (land), property (possessions), rating, real estate, realty, remainder (estate in property), resource, substance (material possessions)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


estate
n.
(1) An interest in or ownership of land.
(2) All the money, property, and goods that one person owns.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


estate
Generally, all the property a person owns at death.
Category: Wills, Trusts & Estates

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

estate
England, Wales
In general terms, an individual's estate is the total of all their assets, less all their liabilities.
For inheritance tax (IHT) purposes, the definition is more specific. An individual's estate for IHT consists of:
• Assets in the sole name of the deceased.
• The deceased's share of any jointly owned assets.
• Assets held in a trust in which the deceased had an immediate post-death interest, a disabled person's interest, or a transitional serial interest.
• Any assets the deceased had given away, but kept an interest in (gift with reservation of benefit).
• The value of an alternatively secured pension fund (ASP) from which the deceased benefited as the original scheme member, or as a dependant who received benefits from the left over ASP fund of an original scheme member.
The total of all these assets is added to the chargeable value of any gifts made within seven years before the death to work out the amount on which IHT is charged.
USA
estate, Also known as bankruptcy estate.
The intangible entity in a bankruptcy case which contains all of the debtor's assets (including both legal and equitable interests) and liabilities as of the commencement of the case.

Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.


estate
n. The totality of an individual's ownership of money, real and personal property.
@ decedent's estate
Such assets after the death of the owner, as involved in the probate of a will or an intestacy proceeding.
=>> estate.
@ residuary estate
The remainder of a decedent's estate after all applicable payments and transfers have been made, including gifts and taxes.
=>> estate.
@ contingent estate
From the common law. An asset, typically real property, that vests only upon the occurrence of a condition.
=>> estate.
@ dominant estate
Real property that benefits from an easement on adjoining property.
=>> estate.
@ equitable estate
An estate recognized under the rules of equity.
=>> estate.
@ possessory estate
A right of possession in an estate, which may not include actual ownership.
=>> estate.
@ servient estate
Real property upon which an easement has been granted.
=>> estate.
@ vested estate
An estate that an individual has a present right to enjoy, or a noncontingent right to do so in the future.
=>> estate.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


estate
The degree, quantity, nature, and extent of interest that a person has in real and personal property. Such terms as estate in land, tenement, and hereditaments may also be used to describe an individual's interest in property.
When used in connection with probate proceedings, the term encompasses the total property that is owned by a decedent prior to the distribution of that property in accordance with the terms of a will, or when there is no will, by the laws of inheritance in the state of domicile of the decedent.
It means, ordinarily, the whole of the property owned by anyone, the realty as well as the personalty.
In its broadest sense, the social, civic, or political condition or standing of a person; or, a class of persons grouped for social, civic, or political purposes.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


estate
I
The degree, quantity, nature, and extent of interest that a person has in real and personal property. Such terms as estate in land, tenement, and hereditaments may also be used to describe an individual's interest in property.
 
When used in connection with probate proceedings, the term encompasses the total property that is owned by a decedent prior to the distribution of that property in accordance with the terms of a will, or when there is no will, by the laws of inheritance in the state of domicile of the decedent.
 
It means, ordinarily, the whole of the property owned by anyone, the realty as well as the personalty.
 
In its broadest sense, the social, civic, or political condition or standing of a person; or, a class of persons grouped for social, civic, or political purposes.
II A person's property.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

estate
n.
   1) all that one owns in real estate and other assets.
   2) commonly, all the possessions of one who has died and are subject to probate (administration supervised by the court) and distribution to heirs and beneficiaries, all the possessions which a guardian manages for a ward (young person requiring protection and administration of affairs), or assets a conservator manages for a conservatee (a person whose physical or mental lack of competence requires administration of his/her affairs).
   3) an alternative term for real property interest which is used in conjunction with another defining word, like "life estate," "estate for years," or "real estate."

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:
, / , (in life or society), / , , , / (of those who constitute the State or the government of a State), , / (in any species of permanent property)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • estate — es‧tate [ɪˈsteɪt] noun [countable] 1. PROPERTY a large piece of land in the country, usually with one large house on it and one owner: • The estate consists of the main villa, several outbuildings and barns, a swimming pool, a farm house and an… …   Financial and business terms

  • Estate — may refer to: * Estate (law), a term used in common law to signify the total of a person s property, entitlements and obligations *Estate (social), a broad social category in the histories of certain countries * Immovable property, real estate or …   Wikipedia

  • Estate — Es*tate ([e^]s*t[=a]t ), n. [OF. estat, F. [ e]tat, L. status, fr. stare to stand. See {Stand}, and cf. {State}.] 1. Settled condition or form of existence; state; condition or circumstances of life or of any person; situation. When I came to man …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • estate — [ə stāt′, istāt′] n. [ME & OFr estat, STATE] 1. a) state or condition [to restore the theater to its former estate] b) a condition or stage of life [to come to man s estate] c) status or rank 2 …   English World dictionary

  • estate — 1. The meaning of estate in the term three estates of the realm is a historical one, ‘an order or class forming part of the body politic’. The three estates are the Lords Spiritual (i.e. the heads of the Church), the Lords Temporal (i.e. the… …   Modern English usage

  • estate — early 13c., rank, standing, condition, from Anglo Fr. astat, O.Fr. estat state, position, condition, health, status, legal estate (Mod.Fr. état), from L. status state or condition, from root of stare to stand from PIE root *sta to stand (see STET …   Etymology dictionary

  • Estate — Es*tate , v. t. 1. To establish. [Obs.] Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster] 2. Tom settle as a fortune. [Archaic] Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. To endow with an estate. [Archaic] [1913 Webster] Then would I . . . Estate them with large land and territory.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • estate — The intangible entity containing all of the non exempt assets and liabilities of the debtor. (Bernstein s Dictionary of Bankruptcy Terminology) Under the Bankruptcy and insolvency Act, the name given to the file or bankruptcy estate. (Dictionary… …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • estate — [n1] extensive manor and its property acreage, area, country home, country place, demesne, domain, dominion, farm, finca, freehold, grounds, holdings, lands, parcel, plantation, quinta, ranch, residence, rural seat, territory, villa; concept 516… …   New thesaurus

  • estate — ► NOUN 1) a property consisting of a large house and extensive grounds. 2) Brit. an area of land and modern buildings developed for residential, industrial, or commercial purposes. 3) a property where crops such as coffee or rubber are cultivated …   English terms dictionary

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