abduction
ab·duc·tion /ab-'dək-shən, əb-/ n
1 a: the action of abducting
abduction of a robbery victim
b: the tort or felony of abducting a person
2: the unlawful carrying away of a wife or female child or ward for the purpose of marriage or sexual intercourse
◇ Sense 2 has its roots in common law. As statutorily defined, mainly in the nineteenth century, abduction is generally stated to include taking away or detention of a woman under a certain age, usu. 16 or 18, with or without her consent or knowledge of her age.

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

abduction
I noun child-stealing, impressment, kidnapping, overmastering, raptus, ravishment, shanghaiing, spiriting away, subjugation, taking away II index taking

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


abduction
the wrongful taking away (usually by force) of a person. In respect of the taking away of a girl under the age of 16, it is a statutory offence in terms of the Sexual Offences Act 1956.
In Scotland the abduction of a girl under 18 is an offence under the Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 1976. There is also a common law crime of abduction with intent to ravish.
The problem of separated parents removing children from one country to another is now regulated in many states by the application of the 1980 Hague Convention on Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction. The child should normally be returned to its country of habitual residence unless there is a grave risk of physical or psychological harm or an otherwise intolerable situation. See, for example, in re C (a minor) [1999] TLR 371.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


abduction
Leading someone away by fraudulent persuasion or by force. In some states, the abductor must intend to marry or defile the person, the person abducted must be a child, or the abductor must intend to subject the victim to concubinage or prostitution. Kidnapping is more limited, requiring the use of force or the threat of force.
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


abduction
The act of restraining another through the use or threat of deadly force or through fraudulent persuasion. The requisite restraint generally requires that the abductor intend to prevent the liberation of the abductee. Some states require that the abductee be a minor or that the abductor intend to subject the abductee to prostitution or illicit sexual activity.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


abduction
The act of restraining another through the use or threat of deadly force or through fraudulent persuasion. The requisite restraint generally requires that the abductor intend to prevent the liberation of the abductee. Some states require that the abductee be a minor or that the abductor intend to subject the abductee to prostitution or illicit sexual activity.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

abduction
n.
   the criminal taking away of a person by persuasion (convincing someone-particularly a minor or a woman-he/she is better off leaving with the persuader), by fraud (telling the person he/she is needed, or that the mother or father wants him/her to come with the abductor), or by open force or violence. Originally abduction applied only to protect women and children as victims. Currently in most states it can also apply to an adult male. In fact, in some states like New York abduction meant the unlawful taking or detention of any female for purposes of "marriage, concubinage or prostitution." Kidnapping is more limited, requiring force, threat of force upon an adult or the taking of children.
   See also: kidnapping

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Abduction — • May be considered as a public crime and a matrimonial diriment impediment Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Abduction     Abduction      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • abduction — [ abdyksjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1541; lat. abductio ♦ Physiol. Mouvement qui écarte un membre ou une partie quelconque du plan médian du corps. ⊗ CONTR. Adduction. ● abduction nom féminin (latin abductio, action d enlever, de séparer) Mouvement qui… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • ABDUCTION — (or Manstealing; Heb. גְּנֵבַת נֶפֶשׁ, genevat nefesh), stealing of a human being for capital gain. According to the Bible, abduction is a capital offense. He who kidnaps a man – whether he has sold him or is still holding him – shall be put to… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Abduction — may refer to:Abduction of a person or people* Kidnapping, as a near synonym in criminal law, but sometimes used particularly in cases involving a woman or child ** Bride kidnapping ** Child abduction, the abduction or kidnapping of a young child… …   Wikipedia

  • Abduction — Título Sin salida (España) Identidad secreta (Argentina) Sin escape (México) Ficha técnica Dirección John Singleton Producción Doug Davison …   Wikipedia Español

  • Abduction — Ab*duc tion, n. [L. abductio: cf. F. abduction.] 1. The act of abducing or abducting; a drawing apart; a carrying away. Roget. [1913 Webster] 2. (Physiol.) The movement which separates a limb or other part from the axis, or middle line, of the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • abduction — (n.) 1620s, a leading away, from L. abductionem (nom. abductio), noun of action from pp. stem of abducere to lead away, take away (often by force), from ab away (see AB (Cf. ab )) + ducere to lead (see DUKE (Cf. duke) (n.)). The illegal activity… …   Etymology dictionary

  • abduction — (18c) is the forcible leading away of a minor (with or without the minor s consent) for marriage or seduction or the breaking of a legal custodial arrangement for the children of divorced parents. Although there is some overlap in meaning with… …   Modern English usage

  • abduction — [n] taking away by force appropriation, kidnapping, rape, seizure, theft; concepts 90,139 …   New thesaurus

  • abduction — [ab duk′shən, əbduk′shən] n. [LL abductio: see ABDUCT] 1. an abducting or being abducted 2. Law the carrying off of a person by force or fraud; esp., the kidnapping of a woman for marriage, prostitution, etc. 3. Physiol. a) an abducting of a part …   English World dictionary

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