forfeiture
for·fei·ture /'fȯr-fə-ˌchu̇r/ n
1: the loss of a right, money, or esp. property because of one's criminal act, default, or failure or neglect to perform a duty compare waiver
2: something (as money or property) that is forfeited as a penalty

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

forfeiture
I (act of forfeiting) noun confiscation, deprivation, deprivation of a right, destruction of a right, disenfranchisement, disentitlement, dispossession, divestiture of property, divestment, eviction, exaction, expropriation, forcible seizure, foreclosure, involuntary loss of right, loss of right, punishment, seizure, seizure of a privilege associated concepts: action for forfeiture, forfeiture clause, forfeiture of bail, forfeiture of bond, forfeiture of deposit, forfeiture of office, forfeiture provision, redemption of property forfeitured, relief from forfeiture, right of forfeiture, tax forfeiture foreign phrases:
- Nullus jus alienum forisfacere potest — No man can forfeit the right of another
II (thing forfeited) noun amercement, cost, fine, loss, loss consequent to a default, mulct, pecuniary penalty, penal retribution, penalization, penalty, punishment III index amercement, cost (penalty), detriment, disqualification (rejection), escheatment, expense (sacrifice), fine, foreclosure, loss, punishment, trover

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


forfeiture
When a tenant is in default under a lease the landlord has the right to terminate the lease and recover possession of the property. A court order is needed on most occasions and the tenant may apply to the court for relief from forfeiture.

Easyform Glossary of Law Terms. — UK law terms.


forfeiture
n.
The taking of property without compensation, usually as a punishment for breaking the law.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


forfeiture
the process by which the holder of a superior interest in property puts an end to an inferior interest in that property, usually as a result of the failure of the holder of that inferior interest to fulfil some obligation owed to the holder of the superior interest. Thus, in many leases, covenants will detail the obligations owed by the tenant to the landlord; a breach of any of these covenants will normally trigger a right on the part of the landlord to forfeit the tenant's lease. See also confiscation.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


forfeiture
The loss of property or a privilege due to breaking a law.
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

forfeiture
The forfeiture of a lease by the re-entering by the landlord on the demised property, or by the commencement of proceedings for possession of the demised property by the landlord. The term is also used more widely in the context of supply of goods to relate to forfeiture of those goods for non-payment.
Related links

Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.


forfeiture
n. The loss or compulsory transfer to another, without compensation, of a right or property interest, usually as a penalty.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


forfeiture
The involuntary relinquishment of money or property without compensation as a consequence of a breach or nonperformance of some legal obligation or the commission of a crime.
The loss of a corporate charter or franchise as a result of illegality, malfeasance, or nonfeasance.
The surrender by an owner of his or her entire interest in real property, mandated by law as a punishment for illegal conduct or negligence. Under old English law, the release of land by a tenant to the tenant's lord due to some breach of conduct, or the loss of goods or chattels (articles of personal property) assessed as a penalty against the perpetrator of some crime or offense and as a recompense to the injured party.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


forfeiture
I
The involuntary relinquishment of money or property without compensation as a consequence of a breach or nonperformance of some legal obligation or the commission of a crime.
 
The loss of a corporate charter or franchise as a result of illegality, malfeasance, or nonfeasance.
 
The surrender by an owner of his or her entire interest in real property, mandated by law as a punishment for illegal conduct or negligence. Under old English law, the release of land by a tenant to the tenant's lord due to some breach of conduct, or the loss of goods or chattels (articles of personal property) assessed as a penalty against the perpetrator of some crime or offense and as a recompense to the injured party.
II A cancellation. A legal action whereby a contract purchaser following default loses all his interest in the property.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

forfeiture
n.
   loss of property due to a violation of law.
   See also: forfeit

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Forfeiture — For fei*ture (?; 135), n. [F. forfeiture, LL. forisfactura.] 1. The act of forfeiting; the loss of some right, privilege, estate, honor, office, or effects, by an offense, crime, breach of condition, or other act. [1913 Webster] Under pain of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • forfeiture — mid 14c., from O.Fr. forfaiture crime, transgression; penalty for committing a crime, from forfait (see FORFEIT (Cf. forfeit)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • forfeiture — [fôr′fə chər] n. 1. the act of forfeiting 2. anything forfeited; penalty or fine …   English World dictionary

  • forfeiture — The loss of rights to an asset outlined in a legal contract if a party fails to fulfill obligations of the contract. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary * * * forfeiture for‧fei‧ture [ˈfɔːftʆə ǁ ˈfɔːrftʆər] noun [uncountable] 1. LAW when someone… …   Financial and business terms

  • forfeiture — /forfatyar/ A comprehensive term which means a divestiture of specific property without compensation; it imposes a loss by the taking away of some preexisting valid right without compensation. L & K Realty Co. v. R.W. Farmer Const. Co., Mo.App.,… …   Black's law dictionary

  • forfeiture — /forfatyar/ A comprehensive term which means a divestiture of specific property without compensation; it imposes a loss by the taking away of some preexisting valid right without compensation. L & K Realty Co. v. R.W. Farmer Const. Co., Mo.App.,… …   Black's law dictionary

  • forfeiture — UK [ˈfɔː(r)fɪtʃə(r)] / US [ˈfɔrfɪtʃər] noun [countable/uncountable] Word forms forfeiture : singular forfeiture plural forfeitures legal the loss of a right, a benefit, or something that you own because you have failed to do something or have… …   English dictionary

  • forfeiture — [[t]fɔ͟ː(r)fɪtʃə(r)[/t]] forfeitures N VAR: oft N of n Forfeiture is the action of forfeiting something. [LEGAL] ...the forfeiture of illegally obtained profits... Both face maximum forfeitures of about $1.2 million …   English dictionary

  • forfeiture — /fawr fi cheuhr/, n. 1. an act of forfeiting. 2. something that is forfeited; fine; mulct. [1300 50; ME forfeiture, forfeture < OF. See FORFEIT, URE] * * * …   Universalium

  • forfeiture — for|feit|ure [ˈfo:fıtʃə US ˈfo:rfıtʃər] n [U and C] formal when someone has their property or money officially taken away because they have broken a law or rule ▪ Refusal to sign meant forfeiture of property and exile …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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