good faith
good faith n [translation of Latin bona fides]: honesty, fairness, and lawfulness of purpose: absence of any intent to defraud, act maliciously, or take unfair advantage
filed the suit in good faith
negotiating in good faith see also good faith exception, good faith purchaser compare bad faith
◇ The meaning of good faith, though always based on honesty, may vary depending on the specific context in which it is used. A person is said to buy in good faith when he or she holds an honest belief in his or her right or title to the property and has no knowledge or reason to know of any defect in the title. In section 1-201 of the Uniform Commercial Code good faith is defined generally as “honesty in fact in the conduct or transaction concerned.” Article 2 of the U.C.C. says “good faith in the case of a merchant means honesty in fact and the observance of reasonable commercial standards of fair dealing in the trade.” Similarly, Article 3 on negotiable instruments defines good faith as “honesty in fact and the observance of reasonable commercial standards of fair dealing,” a definition which also applies to the provisions of Article 4 on bank deposits and collections and Article 4A on funds transfers. The U.C.C. imposes an obligation of good faith on the performance of every contract or duty under its purview. The law also generally requires good faith of fiduciaries and agents acting on behalf of their principals. There is also a requirement under the National Labor Relations Act that employers and unions bargain in good faith.

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

good faith
I noun bona fide, goodness, honest effort, probity, rectitude, sanctity, uprightness associated concepts: good faith attempt, good faith estimate, good faith purchaser, offer in good faith II index fidelity, integrity, loyalty, probity

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


good faith
n.
Sincerity, honesty, lack of deceit; a sincere intention to do what is promised.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


good faith
a requirement in the law, importing an absence of bad faith more than anything, that can be treated as equivalent to 'honestly and decently'. It is imbedded in civilian legal systems but is of lesser significance in the Anglo-American system.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


good faith
Honest intent to fulfill a promise to act or to act without taking an unfair advantage over another person. Absence of intent to defraud someone.
Category: Business, LLCs & Corporations
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


good faith
n. A party's state of mind in acting or carrying out an action or transaction, evincing honesty, fairness, full communication of any hidden issues or information, and an absence of intent to harm other individuals or parties to the transaction.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


good faith
Honesty; a sincere intention to deal fairly with others.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


good faith
Honesty; a sincere intention to deal fairly with others.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

good faith
n.
   honest intent to act without taking an unfair advantage over another person or to fulfill a promise to act, even when some legal technicality is not fulfilled. The term is applied to all kinds of transactions.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Good faith — Good faith, or in Latin bona fide , is the mental and moral state of honesty, conviction as to the truth or falsehood of a proposition or body of opinion, or as to the rectitude or depravity of a line of conduct, even if the conviction is… …   Wikipedia

  • Good Faith — • A phrase employed to designate the mental and moral state of honest, even if objectively unfounded, conviction as to the truth or falsehood of a proposition or body of opinion, or as to the rectitude or depravity of a line of conduct Catholic… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • good faith — is an intangible and abstract quality with no technical meaning or statutory definition, and it encompasses, among other things, an honest belief, the absence of malice and the absence of design to defraud or to seek an unconscionable advantage,… …   Black's law dictionary

  • good faith — is an intangible and abstract quality with no technical meaning or statutory definition, and it encompasses, among other things, an honest belief, the absence of malice and the absence of design to defraud or to seek an unconscionable advantage,… …   Black's law dictionary

  • good faith — ➔ faith * * * good faith UK US noun [U] ► a way of behaving that is honest: »Buyers have no right to keep a stolen car once it has been identified as stolen, even if it was bought in good faith. → Compare BAD FAITH(Cf. ↑ …   Financial and business terms

  • good faith — n [U] when a person, country etc intends to be honest and sincere and does not intend to deceive anyone in good faith ▪ The report claimed that the company had acted in good faith . sign/show/gesture etc of good faith ▪ A ceasefire was declared… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • good faith — noun uncount the intention of behaving in an honest and sincere way: in good faith: I borrowed the money in good faith, but now I can t pay it back …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • good faith — good′ faith′ n. accordance with standards of honesty, trust, sincerity, etc.: to act in good faith[/ex] • Etymology: 1890–95 …   From formal English to slang

  • good faith — n. absence of malice or any intention to deceive; good intentions; sincerity …   English World dictionary

  • good faith — ► NOUN ▪ honesty or sincerity of intention …   English terms dictionary

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