guardian
guard·ian /'gär-dē-ən/ n: one who has or is entitled or legally appointed to the care and management of the person or property of another compare committee, conservator, curator, receiver, tutor
guardian ad li·tem /-ad-'lī-təm, -äd-'lē-tem/: a guardian appointed by a court to represent in a particular lawsuit the interests of a minor, a person not yet born, or a person judged incompetent
guardian by nature: natural guardian in this entry
natural guardian: a guardian by natural relationship having custody of the person but not the property of a minor
◇ Under common law the father is considered the natural guardian of a child until his death or incapacitation, whereupon the mother becomes the natural guardian. Many states have passed statutes giving both parents equal rights as guardians.
statutory guardian: a guardian appointed by statutory authority
testamentary guardian: a person named in a will to serve as a guardian
guard·ian·ship n

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

guardian
I noun argus, attendant, bodyguard, caretaker, champion, chaperon, conductor, conservator, curator, custodian, custos, defender, defensor, escort, gatekeeper, guard, keeper, overseer, patron, praeses, preserver, protector, safeguard, safekeeper, sentinel, sentry, sponsor, superintendent, supervisor, trustee, tutelar, warden, warder, watchman associated concepts: de facto guardian, domestic guardian, general guardian, guardian ad litem, guardian by statute, guardian de son tort, guardian of the person, legal guardian, special guardian, testamentary guardian foreign phrases:
- Tuta est custodia quae sibimet creditur. — That guardianship is secure which trusts to itself alone
- Lucrum facere ex pupiili tutela tutor non debet. — A guardian ought not to make money out of the guardianship of his ward
- Custos statum haeredls in custodia existentis meliorem, non deteriorem, facere potest. — A guardian can make the estate of an existing heir under his guardianship better, but not worse
- Minor minorem custodire non debet, alios enim praesumitur male regere qui selpsum regere nescit. — A minor ought not to be guardian to a minor, for a person who knows not how to govern himself is presumed to be unfit to govern others
II index administrator, caretaker (one caring for property), custodian (protector), fiduciary, patron (influential supporter), protective, sponsor, superintendent, trustee, warden

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


guardian
n.
A person who looks after the legal and financial affairs or takes care of someone who is unable to look after his or her own because of age or disability; see also ad litem, ward

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


guardian
a person who looks after the interests of an infant and is entitled to exercise parental rights over it and who is required to discharge parental responsibilities in respect of it. While still alive, parents are a child's natural guardians; they may appoint guardians to look after the child after their deaths.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


guardian
An adult who has been appointed by a court to control and care for a minor or the minor's property. Someone who looks after a child's property is usually called a "guardian of the estate." An adult who has legal authority to make personal decisions for the child, including responsibility for his physical, medical, and educational needs, is often called a "guardian of the person." Sometimes just one person will be named to take care of all these tasks. An individual appointed by a court to look after an incapacitated adult may also be known as a guardian, but is more frequently called a conservator.
Category: Divorce & Family Law
Category: Wills, Trusts & Estates → Wills
Category: Wills, Trusts & Estates → Estates, Executors & Probate Court

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

guardian
England, Wales
An (adult) individual appointed to take parental responsibility for a child under the age of 18.
For further details (including how guardians can be appointed) see Practice note, Appointing guardians in wills (www.practicallaw.com/4-381-3720).

Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.


guardian
n. An individual designated by law to care for another's person and property because of the former's incompetence to make his or her own decisions.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


guardian
A person lawfully invested with the power, and charged with the obligation, of taking care of and managing the property and rights of a person who, because of age, understanding, or self-control, is considered incapable of administering his or her own affairs.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


guardian
I
A person lawfully invested with the power, and charged with the obligation, of taking care of and managing the property and rights of a person who, because of age, understanding, or self-control, is considered incapable of administering his or her own affairs.
II A person appointed by will or by law to assume responsibility for incompetent adults or minor children. If a parent dies, this will usually be the other parent. If both die, it probably will be a close relative.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

guardian
n.
   a person who has been appointed by a judge to take care of a minor child or incompetent adult (both called "ward") personally and/or manage that person's affairs. To become a guardian of a child either the party intending to be the guardian or another family member, a close friend or a local official responsible for a minor's welfare will petition the court to appoint the guardian. In the case of a minor, the guardianship remains under court supervision until the child reaches majority at 18. Naming someone in a will as guardian of one's child in case of the death of the parent is merely a nomination. The judge does not have to honor that request, although he/she usually does. Sadly, often a parent must petition to become the guardian of his/her child's "estate" if the child inherits or receives a gift of substantial assets, including the situation in which a parent gives his/her own child an interest in real property or stocks. Therefore, that type of gift should be avoided and a trust created instead. While the term "guardian" may refer to someone who is appointed to care for and/or handle the affairs of a person who is incompetent or incapable of administering his/her affairs, this is more often called a "conservator" under a conservatorship.
   See also: conservator, ward

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Guardian — may refer to: * Legal guardianNewspapersIn the United Kingdom* The Guardian , founded in 1821 as the Manchester Guardian and renamed in 1959 * The Guardian (1713), founded in 1713 and running only briefly * The Guardian (Anglican newspaper), an… …   Wikipedia

  • Guardian — (engl. „Hüter“, „Wächter“) steht für: The Guardian, eine britische Tageszeitung Guardian Unlimited, die Webpräsenz der Zeitschrift „The Guardian“ The Guardian (Zeitschrift), eine in den Jahren 1712/13 erschienene britische moralische… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Guardian — puede referirse a: The Guardian, periódico británico. The Guardian, película de 2006 dirigida por Andrew Davis. Guardian (banda), banda de rock cristiano estadounidense. Guardian, enemigo final de la serie de videojuegos de rol Ultima. Grumman AF …   Wikipedia Español

  • Guardian — Guard i*an (g[aum]rd [i^]*an or g[aum]rd yan; 106), a. Performing, or appropriate to, the office of a protector; as, a guardian care. [1913 Webster] {Feast of Guardian Angels} (R. C. Ch.) a church festival instituted by Pope Paul V., and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Guardian — Guard i*an, n. [OF. guardain, gardien, F. gardien, LL. guardianus. See {Guard}, v. t., and cf. {Wasden}.] 1. One who guards, preserves, or secures; one to whom any person or thing is committed for protection, security, or preservation from… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • guardian — early 14c., garden; early 15c., gardein, from Anglo Fr. gardein (late 13c.), from O.Fr. gardien keeper, custodian, earlier guarden, from Frankish *warding (see GUARD (Cf. guard) (n.)). Guardian angel is from 1630s …   Etymology dictionary

  • guardián — guardián, na adjetivo,sustantivo masculino y femenino 1. Persona o animal que guarda o cuida una cosa: perro guardián. sustantivo masculino 1. Superior de un convento franciscano …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • Guardian — (vom mittellat. Guardia, Wache), 1) der Pater Superior (Vorgesetzter) eines Klosters bei den Franciscanern; in einigen anderen Klöstern waren sie untergeordnete Beamtete; 2) in [748] England der während einer geistlichen Vacanz als Verwalter der… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Guardiān — (mittellat. guardianus, v. ital. guardiáno, »Wächter, Hüter«), heißt bei den Franziskanern und Kapuzinern der Pater Superior oder Vorgesetzte, in England derjenige, der während einer geistlichen Vakanz die geistliche Jurisdiktion in einer Diözese …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Guardian — Guardiān (ital.), Hüter, Wächter; in Franziskaner und Kapuzinerklöstern der Vorsteher; in England Stellvertreter eines Bischofs während einer Vakanz …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

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