immunity
im·mu·ni·ty /i-'myü-nə-tē/ n pl -ties [Latin immunitas, from immunis exempt from public service, exempt, from in- non- + -munis (from munia services)]
1: exemption from a duty or liability that is granted by law to a person or class of persons
a defendant may not take the stand in his own behalf and then claim immunity from cross-examination — W. R. LaFave and A. W. Scott, Jr.; also: the affirmative defense of having such an exemption
absolute immunity: immunity from all personal civil liability without limits or conditions (as a requirement of good faith) compare qualified immunity in this entry
charitable immunity: immunity from civil liability esp. for negligent torts that is granted to a charitable or nonprofit organization (as a hospital)
constitutional immunity: immunity (as from a tax) that is granted or created by a constitution (as the U.S. Constitution)
corporate immunity: immunity from personal liability for tortious acts that is granted to an officer of a corporation who acted in good faith and within the course of his or her duties see also business judgment rule compare pierce
dip·lo·mat·ic immunity: immunity (as from taxes or prosecution) granted to a diplomat
discovery immunity: immunity (2)
discretionary immunity: qualified immunity from civil liability for tortious acts or omissions that arise from a government employee's discretionary acts performed as part of the employee's duties see also the federal tort claims act in the important laws section
◇ The Federal Tort Claims Act includes an additional requirement of acting in good faith for the discretionary immunity granted to the federal government.
executive immunity: immunity granted to officers of the executive branch of government from personal liability for tortious acts or omissions done in the course of carrying out their duties
◇ While the president's executive immunity is absolute, the immunity of other federal executive officials is qualified.
governmental immunity: discretionary immunity granted to a governmental unit (as an agency) or its employees; broadly: sovereign immunity in this entry
judicial immunity: absolute immunity from civil liability that is granted to judges and other court officers (as prosecutors and grand juries) and quasi-judicial officials for tortious acts or omissions done within the scope of their jurisdiction or authority
legislative immunity: absolute immunity from civil liability that is granted to legislators for tortious acts or omissions done in the course of legislative activities see also speech or debate clause
official immunity: discretionary immunity from personal liability that is granted to public officers for tortious acts and omissions compare governmental immunity in this entry
qualified immunity: immunity from civil liability that is conditioned or limited (as by a requirement of good faith or due care); specif: official immunity from damages for acts that violate another's civil rights that is granted if it can be shown that the acts do not violate clearly established statutory or constitutional rights of which a reasonable person would be aware see also civil rights act in the important laws section
sovereign immunity: the absolute immunity of a sovereign government (as a state) from being sued see also federal tort claims act in the important laws section amendment xi to the constitution in the back matter
◇ For an action to be brought against a state or the federal government, sovereign immunity must be waived by the government.
trans·ac·tion·al immunity /tran-'zak-shə-nəl-, -'sak-/: immunity from criminal prosecution granted to a witness for an offense related to his or her compelled testimony — see also use immunity in this entry
use immunity: immunity granted to a witness in a criminal case that prevents the use of the witness's compelled testimony against that witness in a criminal prosecution
◇ Transactional and use immunity are granted to preserve the constitutional protection against self-incrimination. The states grant either form of this immunity, while the federal government grants only use immunity. A witness with use immunity may still be prosecuted, but only based on evidence not gathered from the protected testimony.
2: a usu. statutory prohibition that excludes specific documents or information from discovery – called also discovery immunity;

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

immunity
I noun absolution, acquittal, charter, commutation, discharge, exception, exculpation, exemption, exemption from punishment, franchise, freedom, freedom from exemption, freedom from obligation, freedom from prosecution, immunitas, liberation, liberty, license, nonliability, privilege, protection, release, release from charge, release from duty, relief, reprieve, respite, safety from prosecution, special privilege, vacatio associated concepts: absolute immunity, complete immunity, derivative immunity, full transactional immunity, full waiver, governmental immunity, immunity from arrest, immunity from prosecution, immunity from service of process, limited immunity, limited waiver, partial immunity, privileges and immunities, qualified immunity, state immunity, transactional immunity, use and derivative immunity, use immunity, waiver of immunity II index dispensation (exception), exclusion, exemption, franchise (license), impunity, privilege, protection, release, resistance, respite (reprieve), sanction (permission), security (safety), tolerance

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


immunity
Under Section 20 of the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 a trade union may be immune from legal liability for a tort (a civil wrong against another party) for inducing or threatening to break a contract (i.e. an employment contract between the employer and employee) if done in contemplation or furtherance of a legitimate trade dispute. Immunity can be lost under certain specified circumstances.

Easyform Glossary of Law Terms. — UK law terms.


immunity
n.
Exemption or protection from something such as prosecution, duty, or penalty.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


immunity
freedom from obligation or duty, especially exemption from tax, duty, legal liability, etc.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


immunity
Exemption from penalties, payments, or legal requirements, granted by authorities or statutes. Generally there are four types of immunity at law:
1) a promise not to prosecute for a crime in exchange for information or testimony in a criminal matter, granted by the prosecutors, a judge, a grand jury, or an investigating legislative committee;
2) public officials' protection from liability for their decisions (like a city manager or member of a public hospital board)
3) governmental (or sovereign) immunity, which protects government agencies from lawsuits unless the government agreed to be sued;
4) diplomatic immunity which excuses foreign ambassadors from most U.S. criminal laws.
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


immunity
n.
1 An exemption from a duty or penalty.
2 A permanent status, as for a diplomat, exempting one from being sued or prosecuted for certain actions.
3 A special status, granted by a prosecutor, exempting a witness from being prosecuted for the acts to which he or she testifies.
@ governmental immunity
@ sovereign immunity
The doctrine (subject to certain exceptions) that a government may not be sued in its own courts or in courts of another nation or level of government; many limitations on this doctrine apply and vary from state to state. Sometimes referred to as governmental immunity.
=>> immunity.
@ transactional immunity
A grant of immunity to a witness by a prosecutor that exempts the witness from being prosecuted for the acts about which the witness will testify.
=>> immunity.
@ use immunity
A grant of immunity to a witness by a prosecutor, under which the prosecutor promises not to use the witness' testimony against him or her, but reserves the right to prosecute the witness for the underlying action.
=>> immunity.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


immunity
Exemption from performing duties that the law generally requires other citizens to perform, or from a penalty or burden that the law generally places upon other citizens.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


immunity
I
Exemption from performing duties that the law generally requires other citizens to perform, or from a penalty or burden that the law generally places upon other citizens.
II Grant by the court, which assures someone will not face prosecution in return for providing criminal evidence.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

immunity
n.
   exemption from penalties, payments or legal requirements, granted by authorities or statutes. Generally there are three types of immunity at law: a) a promise not to prosecute for a crime in exchange for information or testimony in a criminal matter, granted by the prosecutors, a judge, a grand jury or an investigating legislative committee; b) public officials' protection from liability for their decisions (like a city manager or member of a public hospital board); c) governmental (or sovereign) immunity, which protects government agencies from lawsuits unless the government agreed to be sued; d) diplomatic immunity which excuses foreign ambassadors from most U.S. criminal laws.
   See also: governmental immunity

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Immunity — • An exemption from a legal obligation (munus), imposed on a person or his property by law, custom, or the order of a superior Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Immunity     Immunity …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Immunity — Immunity: Medicine Immunity (medical), resistance of an organism to infection or disease. Immunity (journal), a scientific journal published by Cell Press Law Amnesty law, immunity from past crimes Charitable immunity, immunity from liability… …   Wikipedia

  • immunity — UK US /ɪˈmjuːnəti/ noun [U] ► LAW official protection from legal action, for example, not being judged in a court or punished for a crime: grant/give sb immunity »Taken before a federal judge, he was granted immunity but ordered to testify or… …   Financial and business terms

  • immunity — immunity, impunity In non medical contexts immunity means ‘freedom or exemption from an obligation, penalty, or unfavourable circumstance’ and like immune can be followed by to or from: • Balder was a son of the most senior god, Odin, and one… …   Modern English usage

  • Immunity — Im*mu ni*ty, n.; pl. {Immunities}. [L. immunitas, fr. immunis free from a public service; pref. im not + munis complaisant, obliging, cf. munus service, duty: cf. F. immunit[ e]. See {Common}, and cf. {Mean}, a.] 1. Freedom or exemption from any… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • immunity — immunity. См. иммунитет. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • immunity — (n.) late 14c., exempt from service or obligation, from O.Fr. immunité and directly from L. immunitatem (nom. immunitas) exemption from performing public service or charge, from immunis exempt, free, from assimilated form of in not, opposite of… …   Etymology dictionary

  • immunity — *exemption Antonyms: susceptibility …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • immunity — [n] privilege, exemption amnesty, charter, exoneration, franchise, freedom, impunity, indemnity, invulnerability, liberty, license, prerogative, protection, release, resistance, right; concepts 316,376,388 Ant. defenselessness, responsibility,… …   New thesaurus

  • immunity — ► NOUN (pl. immunities) 1) the ability of an organism to resist a particular infection. 2) exemption from an obligation or penalty …   English terms dictionary

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