joinder
join·der /'jȯin-dər/ n [Anglo-French, from joinder to join, from Old French joindre, from Latin jungere]: the act or an instance of joining: as
a: a joining of parties as coplaintiffs or codefendants in a suit; also: a joining of claims by one or more plaintiffs in a suit see also misjoinder compare counterclaim, cross-claim, impleader, interpleader, intervention, sever 3c
collusive joinder: an addition of a party to a suit made for the purpose of manufacturing federal jurisdiction
◇ Under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure a federal district court will not have jurisdiction when collusive joinder is made.
compulsory joinder: joinder of a party to a suit required by the court when the party is indispensable to complete relief for parties already involved or when the party claims an interest that may substantially affect the other parties or may be put at risk by the action
joinder of remedies: a joining of two claims in one action even though one cannot be recognized until the other is resolved; specif: the combination of legal and equitable claims in one action when a fraudulent conveyance must first be set aside legally before equitable relief can be granted to a creditor
permissive joinder: a joining in a suit as coplaintiffs or codefendants of any parties that share common issues of law or fact in regard to the same occurrences or transactions; also: a joining in one suit of any legal, equitable, or maritime claims a party has against the opposing party
b: a joining of offenses or defendants in an indictment, information, or prosecution
c: a formal answer (as denial of fact) to an issue tendered
moved for summary judgment after joinder of issue
d: a joining into a common transaction
requires the joinder of both spouses — W. M. McGovern, Jr. et al.

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

joinder
I adjective assemblage, bringing together, coalescence, combination, concatenation, conjugation, conjunction, connection, coupling, joining, junction, linkage, linking, unification, union associated concepts: fraudulent joinder, improper joinder, joinder of issue, joinder of parties, misjoinder, permissive joinder, severance II index attachment (act of affixing), merger

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


joinder
n.
The act of uniting parties or causes of action to a lawsuit.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


joinder
The joining together of several lawsuits or several parties all in one lawsuit because the legal issues and the factual situation are the same for all plaintiffs and defendants, or because a party is necessary to the resolution of the case. Joinder may be mandatory if a person necessary to a fair result was not included in the original lawsuit, or it may be permissive if joining the cases together is only a matter of convenience or economy.
Category: Accidents & Injuries
Category: Representing Yourself in Court
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

joinder
The joining to an action of a person or persons with whom common questions of law or fact arise.

Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.


joinder
n. The combination of separate parties or claims into a single lawsuit.
@ compulsory joinder
The required joinder of a party without whom a dispute cannot be fully resolved.
=>> joinder.
@ misjoinder
The joining of a party who is not properly a part of the case.
n. The improper addition or inclusion of parties or claims in a civil case, or of charges in a criminal case.
=>> joinder.
@ nonjoinder
The failure to join a party who should be part of the case.
=>> joinder.
@ permissive joinder
The optional joinder of parties or claims because of an overlap in the issues or interests involved.
=>> joinder.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


joinder
The union in one lawsuit of multiple parties who have the same rights or against whom rights are claimed as coplaintiffs or codefendants. The combination in one lawsuit of two or more causes of action, or grounds for relief. At common law the acceptance by opposing parties that a particular issue is in dispute.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


joinder
The union in one lawsuit of multiple parties who have the same rights or against whom rights are claimed as coplaintiffs or codefendants. The combination in one lawsuit of two or more causes of action, or grounds for relief. At common law the acceptance by opposing parties that a particular issue is in dispute.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

joinder
n.
   the joining together of several lawsuits or several parties all in one lawsuit, provided that the legal issues and the factual situation are the same for all plaintiffs and defendants. Joinder requires a) that one of the parties to one of the lawsuits make a motion to join the suits and the parties in a single case; b) notice must be made to all parties; c) there must be a hearing before a judge to show why joinder will not cause prejudice (hurt) to any of the parties to the existing lawsuits; and d) an order of the judge permitting joinder. Joinder may be mandatory if a person necessary to a fair result was not included in the original lawsuit, or it may be permissive if joining the cases together is only a matter of convenience or economy.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • joinder — in civil law falls under two categories: joinder of claims, and joinder of parties. Joinder of claims is addressed in U.S. law by the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure No. 18(a). That Rule allows claimants to consolidate all claims that they have… …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • Joinder — Join der, n. [F. joindre. See {Join}, v. t.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of joining; a putting together; conjunction. [1913 Webster] Confirmed by mutual joinder of your hands. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) (a) A joining of parties as plaintiffs or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • joinder — (n.) act of joining together (usually in specific legal senses), c.1600, from Fr. joindre to join, taken as a noun (see JOIN (Cf. join)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • joinder — [join′dər] n. [OFr joindre, use of inf. as n.: see JOIN] 1. a joining; act of meeting or coming together 2. Law a) a joining of causes b) a joining of parties as plaintiffs or defendants c) a uniting on facts or procedure …   English World dictionary

  • joinder — Joining or coupling together; uniting two or more constituents or elements in one; uniting with another person in some legal step or proceeding; union; concurrence. The consent to an agreement or document by a party who has an interest in the… …   Black's law dictionary

  • joinder — Joining or coupling together; uniting two or more constituents or elements in one; uniting with another person in some legal step or proceeding; union; concurrence. The consent to an agreement or document by a party who has an interest in the… …   Black's law dictionary

  • Joinder — Civil procedure in the United States Federal Rules of Civil Procedure Doctrines of civil procedure Jurisdiction Subject matter jurisdiction Diversity jurisdiction Personal jurisdiction Removal jurisdiction Venue Change of venue …   Wikipedia

  • joinder — noun Etymology: Anglo French joinder, joindre, from joindre to join Date: 1601 1. conjunction 1 2. a. (1) a joining of parties as plaintiffs or defendants in a suit (2) a joining of causes of action or defense b. acceptance of an issue tendered …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • joinder — /joyn deuhr/, n. 1. the act of joining. 2. Law. a. the joining of causes of action in a suit. b. the joining of parties in a suit. c. the acceptance by a party to an action of an issue tendered. [1595 1605; < F joindre. See JOIN, ER3] * * * …   Universalium

  • joinder — noun The joining a litigant to a suit …   Wiktionary

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