a priori assumption
(ay pree or-ee) From Latin, an assumption that is knowable without further need to prove or experience it.
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Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

a priori assumption
[ah-pree-ory]
n.
   from Latin, an assumption that is true without further proof or need to prove it. It is assumed the sun will come up tomorrow. However, it has a negative side: an a priori assumption made without question on the basis that no analysis or study is necessary, can be mental laziness when the reality is not so certain.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

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