amicus curiae
amicus cu·ri·ae /-'kyu̇r-ē-ˌī, -'ku̇r-, -ē-ˌē/ n pl amici curiae [New Latin, literally, friend of the court]: one (as an individual or organization) that is not a party to a particular lawsuit but is allowed to advise the court regarding a point of law or fact directly concerning the lawsuit
a brief of an amicus curiae may be filedFederal Rules of Appellate Procedure Rule 29 – called also friend of the court;

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

amicus curiae
noun advocate, champion, exponent, friend in court, intercessor, intervening party, intervenor, party, representative, speaker associated concepts: amicus brief, amicus motion to intervene

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


amicus curiae
n.
(Latin) Friend of the court; someone who is not a party to a lawsuit but who has a strong interest in the subject matter of a case and petitions the court for permission to file a brief providing information on the matter to aid the court in rendering its decision; such a brief is called an amicus curiae brief or amicus brief.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


amicus curiae
'friend of the court', a person who is not actually involved in a case as a party but who brings a matter to the attention of the court. Usually the issue involves the public interest. It is not a universally applicable procedure.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


amicus curiae
Latin for "friend of the court," a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit but that has a strong interest in the case and wants to participate, usually by filing a brief in support of one party's position. Amicus curiae must be invited by the court or obtain permission from the court before participating.
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits
Category: Working With a Lawyer

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

amicus curiae
USA
Latin for "friend of the court." A non-party with an interest in the outcome of a pending lawsuit who argues (or presents information) in support of, or against, one of the parties to the lawsuit. In many instances, the amicus curiae attempts to draw the court's attention to arguments or information that may not have been presented by the parties, such as the effects of a particular court ruling on the interests of certain third parties.
The arguments or information advanced by the amicus curiae are usually presented to the court in the form of a brief. Amicus briefs are typically filed at the appellate level, although they may also be filed in lawsuits pending at the trial court level. Generally, an amicus curiae must get the court's permission before filing its brief, unless all of the parties consent to the amicus filing. The procedure for filing amicus briefs in the US Supreme Court is governed by Supreme Court Rule 37. The procedure for filing amicus briefs in federal circuit courts of appeals is governed by Rule 29 of the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure.
Amici curiae are not parties to the lawsuit, unless they formally intervene. As a result, an amicus curiae does not need to have standing to bring suit. Further, as a non-party, an amicus curiae normally does not have the rights that parties in a lawsuit have, such as the right to obtain discovery from the other parties.

Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.


amicus curiae
n. Latin Friend of the court. One who is not a party to an action but petitions the court or is invited by the court to provide information or submit her views because she has a strong interest in the case at hand or a perspective that may not be adequately presented by the parties.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


amicus curiae
Literally, friend of the court. A person with strong interest in or views on the subject matter of an action, but not a party to the action, may petition the court for permission to file a brief, ostensibly on behalf of a party but actually to suggest a rationale consistent with its own views. Such amicus curiae briefs are commonly filed in appeals concerning matters of a broad public interest; e.g., civil rights cases. They may be filed by private persons or the government.
In appeals to the U.S. courts of appeals, an amicus brief may be filed only if accompanied by written consent of all parties, or by leave of court granted on motion or at the request of the court, except that consent or leave shall not be required when the brief is presented by the United States or an officer or agency thereof.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


amicus curiae
I
Literally, friend of the court. A person with strong interest in or views on the subject matter of an action, but not a party to the action, may petition the court for permission to file a brief, ostensibly on behalf of a party but actually to suggest a rationale consistent with its own views. Such amicus curiae briefs are commonly filed in appeals concerning matters of a broad public interest; e.g., civil rights cases. They may be filed by private persons or the government.
 
In appeals to the U.S. courts of appeals, an amicus brief may be filed only if accompanied by written consent of all parties, or by leave of court granted on motion or at the request of the court, except that consent or leave shall not be required when the brief is presented by the United States or an officer or agency thereof.
II Friend of the court.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

amicus curiae
n.
   Latin for "friend of the court," a party or an organization interested in an issue which files a brief or participates in the argument in a case in which that party or organization is not one of the litigants. For example, the American Civil Liberties Union often files briefs on behalf of a party who contends his constitutional rights have been violated, even though the claimant has his own attorney. Friends of the Earth or the Sierra Club may file a supporting amicus curiae brief in an environmental action in which they are not actually parties. Usually the court must give permission for the brief to be filed and arguments may only be made with the agreement of the party the amicus curiae is supporting, and that argument comes out of the time allowed for that party's presentation to the court.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Amicus curiae — or amicus curiæ (plural amici curiae ) is a legal Latin phrase, literally translated as friend of the court , that refers to someone, not a party to a case, who volunteers to offer information on a point of law or some other aspect of the case to …   Wikipedia

  • Amicus curiae — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda El amicus curiae (amigo de la corte o amigo del tribunal) es una expresión latina utilizada para referirse a presentaciones realizadas por terceros ajenos a un litigio, que ofrecen voluntariamente su opinión frente a …   Wikipedia Español

  • Amicus Curiae — (auch amicus curiæ, Pl. Amici Curiae, lat.: Freund des Gerichts) bezeichnet eine Person oder eine Organisation, die sich an einem Gerichtsverfahren beteiligt, ohne selbst Partei zu sein. Diese Beteiligung kann z. B. als „Äußerung Dritter“ in …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • amicus curiae — 1610s, Latin, lit. friend of the courts; plural is amici curiae. From L. amicus friend, related to amare to love (see AMY (Cf. Amy)) + curia court (see CURIA (Cf. curia)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • amicus curiae — [kyoor′ē ē΄] n. [L, lit., friend of the court] Law a person who offers, or is called in, to advise a court on some legal matter …   English World dictionary

  • Amicus curiae — In diesem Artikel oder Abschnitt fehlen folgende wichtige Informationen: römischer Ursprung, Bestellung als A.C., Stellungnahme ad hoc, formelle und tatsächliche Bedeutung der Teilnahme als A.C., Abgrenzung zur Beiladung, Streitverkündung;… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • amicus curiae — /euh muy keuhs kyoor ee ee , euh mee keuhs kyoor ee uy /, pl. amici curiae /euh muy kuy kyoor ee ee , euh mee kee kyoor ee uy /. Law. a person, not a party to the litigation, who volunteers or is invited by the court to give advice upon some… …   Universalium

  • amicus curiae — noun a person/entity who has been allowed by the court to plead or make submissions but who, however, is not directly involved in the action. BANNATYNE v BANNATYNE (COMMISSION FOR GENDER EQUALITY, AS AMICUS CURIAE) 2003 (2) SA 363 (CC) The Court… …   Wiktionary

  • amicus curiae — n. (pl. amici curiae) Law an impartial adviser in a court of law. Etymology: mod.L, = friend of the court * * * /euh muy keuhs kyoor ee ee , euh mee keuhs kyoor ee uy /, pl. amici curiae /euh muy kuy kyoor ee ee , euh mee kee kyoor ee uy /. Law.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Amicus curiae — Un Amicus curiae est une expression légale latine signifiant « ami de la cour », référant à quelqu un qui, n étant pas partie à une cause, se porte volontaire pour aider la cour à trancher une matière. Portail du droit Catégorie :… …   Wikipédia en Français

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