amortization
I noun clearance, defrayal, defrayment, disbursement, discharge, extinction of a debt, extinguishment of claim, liquidation of a debt, payment, remittance, satisfaction associated concepts: amortization contract, amortization of a mortgage, amortize a loan II index discharge (payment), payment (act of paying)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


amortization
(1) A periodic payment plan to pay a debt (such as a mortgage or car loan) by a certain date, in which interest and a portion of the principal is included in each payment. Payments are usually calculated in equal monthly installments. Since the largest portion of the early payments is interest (based on the amount owed), the principal doesn't decline significantly until the latter stages of the loan term. (2) A tax method of recovering costs of certain assets by taking deductions evenly over time. This is similar to straight-line depreciation and unlike an accelerated depreciation method. For example, when someone buys a company, the Internal Revenue Code directs that business goodwill costs must be amortized over 15 years by the buyer.
Category: Bankruptcy, Foreclosure & Debt
Category: Business, LLCs & Corporations
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Category: Real Estate & Rental Property

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

amortization
USA
This term means either:
• The repayment of principal and interest on a loan in regular installments over a period of time until maturity; or
• The ratable deduction for the cost of certain intangible property (such as goodwill, an agreement not to compete, and research and mining exploration costs) over a specified period of time.
The repayment or cost is said to be 'amortized' over a period of time.

Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.


amortization
The reduction of a debt incurred, for example, in the purchase of stocks or bonds, by regular payments consisting of interest and part of the principal made over a specified time period upon the expiration of which the entire debt is repaid. A mortgage is amortized when it is repaid with periodic payments over a particular term. After a certain portion of each payment is applied to the interest on the debt, any balance reduces the principal.
The allocation of the cost of an intangible asset, for example, a patent or copyright, over its estimated useful life that is considered an expense of doing business and is used to offset the earnings of the asset by its declining value. If an intangible asset has an indefinite life, such as good will, it cannot be amortized.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


amortization
The reduction of a debt incurred, for example, in the purchase of stocks or bonds, by regular payments consisting of interest and part of the principal made over a specified time period upon the expiration of which the entire debt is repaid. A mortgage is amortized when it is repaid with periodic payments over a particular term. After a certain portion of each payment is applied to the interest on the debt, any balance reduces the principal.
 
The allocation of the cost of an intangible asset, for example, a patent or copyright, over its estimated useful life that is considered an expense of doing business and is used to offset the earnings of the asset by its declining value. If an intangible asset has an indefinite life, such as good will, it cannot be amortized.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

amortization
n.
   a periodic payment plan to pay a debt in which the interest and a portion of the principal are included in each payment by an established mathematical formula. Most commonly it is used on a real property loan or financing of an automobile or other purchase. By figuring the interest on the declining principal and the number of years of the loan, the monthly payments are averaged and determined. Since the main portion of the early payments is interest, the principal does not decline rapidly until the latter stages of the loan term. If the amortization leaves a principal balance at the close of the time for repayment, this final lump sum is called a "balloon" payment.
   See also: promissory note

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Amortization — or amortisation is the process of decreasing, or accounting for, an amount over a period of time. The word comes from Middle English amortisen to kill, alienate in mortmain, from Anglo French amorteser , alteration of amortir , from Vulgar Latin… …   Wikipedia

  • Amortization — A*mor ti*za tion, n. [LL. amortisatio, admortizatio. See {Amortize}, and cf. {Admortization}.] 1. (Law) The act or right of alienating lands to a corporation, which was considered formerly as transferring them to dead hands, or in mortmain. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • amortization — (n.) 1670s, in reference to lands given to religious orders, from M.L. amortizationem (nom. amortizatio), noun of action from pp. stem of amortizare (see AMORTIZE (Cf. amortize)). Of debts, from 1824 …   Etymology dictionary

  • amortization — [ə môr′tiz məntam΄ər ti zā′shən, ə môr΄təzā′shən] n. 1. an amortizing or being amortized 2. money put aside for amortizing a debt, etc.: also amortizement [ə môr′tiz mənt] …   English World dictionary

  • amortization — (1) The process of making regular, periodic decreases in the book or carrying value of an asset. For example, when a bond is purchased at a price above 100, the difference between the purchase price and the par value, the premium, is amortized.… …   Financial and business terms

  • amortization — A cost *allocation method used to record the reduction in value of an asset over time. The classic case of amortization is the matching of the cost of an item of *property, plant, and equipment to its *useful life. Assets generally lose value as… …   Auditor's dictionary

  • amortization — / amortazeyshsn/ In accounting, the allocation (and charge to expense) of the cost or other basis of an intangible asset over its estimated useful life. Intangible assets which have an indefinite life (e.g., goodwill) are not amortizable.… …   Black's law dictionary

  • amortization — / amortazeyshsn/ In accounting, the allocation (and charge to expense) of the cost or other basis of an intangible asset over its estimated useful life. Intangible assets which have an indefinite life (e.g., goodwill) are not amortizable.… …   Black's law dictionary

  • amortization — /am euhr teuh zay sheuhn, euh mawr /, n. 1. an act or instance of amortizing a debt or other obligation. 2. the sums devoted to this purpose. Also, amortizement. [1665 75; < ML a(d)mortization (s. of admortizatio). See AMORTIZE, ATION] * * * In… …   Universalium

  • Amortization — The repayment of a loan by installments. The New York Times Financial Glossary * * * amortization a‧mor‧ti‧za‧tion [əˌmɔːtaɪˈzeɪʆn ǁ ˌæmərtə ] also amortisation noun 1. [countable, uncountable] ACCOUNTING …   Financial and business terms

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