mental anguish
men·tal an·guish n: a high degree of emotional pain, distress, torment, or suffering that may aggravate a crime or be a subject of an action for damages or wrongful death: emotional distress

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

mental anguish
n.
Extreme distress, anxiety, and any other mental pain that is extreme enough to merit damages for the victim.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


mental anguish
A type of suffering that can be compensated in a personal injury case, generally meaning significant mental suffering that may include fright, feelings of distress, anxiety, depression, trauma, or grief.
Category: Accidents & Injuries
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


mental anguish
When connected with a physical injury, includes both the resultant mental sensation of pain and also the accompanying feelings of distress, fright, and anxiety. As an element of damages implies a relatively high degree of mental pain and distress; it is more than mere disappointment, anger, worry, resentment, or embarrassment, although it may include all of these, and it includes mental sensation of pain resulting from such painful emotions as grief, severe disappointment, indignation, wounded pride, shame, despair, and/or public humiliation. In other connections, and as a ground for divorce or for compensable damages or an element of damages, it includes the mental suffering resulting from the excitation of the more poignant and painful emotions, such as grief, severe disappointment, indignation, wounded pride, shame, public humiliation, despair, etc.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


mental anguish
When connected with a physical injury, includes both the resultant mental sensation of pain and also the accompanying feelings of distress, fright, and anxiety. As an element of damages implies a relatively high degree of mental pain and distress; it is more than mere disappointment, anger, worry, resentment, or embarrassment, although it may include all of these, and it includes mental sensation of pain resulting from such painful emotions as grief, severe disappointment, indignation, wounded pride, shame, despair, and/or public humiliation. In other connections, and as a ground for divorce or for compensable damages or an element of damages, it includes the mental suffering resulting from the excitation of the more poignant and painful emotions, such as grief, severe disappointment, indignation, wounded pride, shame, public humiliation, despair, etc.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

mental anguish
n.
   mental suffering which includes fright, feelings of distress, anxiety, depression, grief and/or psychosomatic physical symptoms. It is distinguished from physical pain due to an injury, but it may be considered in awarding damages for physical injury due to a defendant's negligence or intentional infliction of harm. Where there is no physical injury, damages can still be awarded for mental anguish if it is reasonable to presume such would naturally flow from the incident. Examples: holding a pistol to one's head, any threat of bodily harm when it appears it could be carried out, swinging with a scythe even though the assailant missed, or witnessing injury or death to a loved one. There are also situations in which the obvious result of the alleged wrongdoing would be mental distress due to embarrassment or damage to one's reputation through libel, and therefore damages can be awarded to the distressed party. However, there are limits: in general, breach of contract judgments cannot include damages for mental anguish due to the loss of a deal or employment. But then there is the case of the shop which failed to deliver the bridal gown in time for the wedding-mental anguish flows naturally (along with the bride's tears) from such a breach.
   See also: damages, mental suffering

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • mental anguish — When connected with a physical injury, this term includes both the resultant mental sensation of pain and also the accompanying feelings of distress, fright, and anxiety. As an element of damages implies a relatively high degree of mental pain… …   Black's law dictionary

  • mental anguish — When connected with a physical injury, this term includes both the resultant mental sensation of pain and also the accompanying feelings of distress, fright, and anxiety. As an element of damages implies a relatively high degree of mental pain… …   Black's law dictionary

  • mental anguish — Grief. Mental suffering as distinguished from physical pain, but inclusive of the mental reaction to physical pain and suffering caused by a personal injury. 22 Am J2d Damg § 195 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • mental anguish — noun sustained dull painful emotion • Hypernyms: ↑pain, ↑painfulness …   Useful english dictionary

  • mental suffering — mental suf·fer·ing n: emotional distress Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. mental suffering …   Law dictionary

  • anguish — I verb ache, aggrieve, agonize, desolate, disturb, excruciate, grieve, harry, make miserable, pain, prostrate, rack, suffer, torment, torture, trouble, writhe associated concepts: mental anguish, noneconomic loss, pain and suffering II index pain …   Law dictionary

  • anguish — n. (formal) 1) to cause anguish 2) deep; mental anguish 3) anguish at, over 4) in anguish (in anguish over smb. s death) * * * [ æŋgwɪʃ] mental anguish over (formal) to cause anguish deep anguish at …   Combinatory dictionary

  • mental cruelty — A course of conduct on the part of one spouse toward the other spouse which can endanger the mental and physical health and efficiency of the other spouse to such an extent as to render continuance of the marital relation intolerable. As a ground …   Black's law dictionary

  • mental cruelty — A course of conduct on the part of one spouse toward the other spouse which can endanger the mental and physical health and efficiency of the other spouse to such an extent as to render continuance of the marital relation intolerable. As a ground …   Black's law dictionary

  • mental — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin mentalis, from Latin ment , mens mind more at mind Date: 15th century 1. a. of or relating to the mind; specifically of or relating to the total emotional and intellectual response of an… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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