motion
mo·tion 1 n [Anglo-French, from Latin motion- motio movement, from movēre to move]
1: a proposal for action; esp: a formal proposal made in a legislative assembly
made a motion to refer the bill to committee
2 a: an application made to a court or judge to obtain an order, ruling, or direction
a motion to arrest judgment; also: a document containing such an application
b: the initiative of a court to issue an order, ruling, or direction
the court is given discretion to order a pretrial conference either on its own motion or at the request of a party — J. H. Friedenthal et al.
motion for judgment on the pleadings: a motion made after pleadings have been entered that requests the court to issue a judgment at that point compare summary judgment at judgment 1a
◇ Under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, if matters outside of the pleadings are presented to the court when a motion for judgment on the pleadings is made, the motion will be treated as a motion for summary judgment.
motion for more definite statement: a motion that is filed before an answer and that requests the court to order the plaintiff to clarify allegations in the complaint because the claims are so vague or ambiguous that an answer cannot reasonably be framed
motion in bar: a motion that bars an action (as trial or prosecution)
— used esp. in Georgia and Illinois
motion in lim·i·ne /-in-'li-mə-nē/: a usu. pretrial motion that requests the court to issue an interlocutory order which prevents an opposing party from introducing or referring to potentially irrelevant, prejudicial, or otherwise inadmissible evidence until the court has finally ruled on its admissibility
motion to suppress: a pretrial motion requesting the court to exclude evidence that was obtained illegally and esp. in violation of Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendment protections
om·ni·bus motion /'äm-ni-bəs-/: a motion that makes multiple requests
filing an omnibus motion to dismiss and for a more definite statementDepartment of Ins. of Florida v. Coopers & Lybrand, 570 So. 2d 369 (1990)
motion 2 vb: move
motion ed for a summary judgment

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

motion
I noun application, application for a ruling, application for an order, application for proposed relief, claim, demand, petition, proposal, proposed measure, proposition, request, rogatio, sententia associated concepts: alternative motions, costs of a motion, ex parte motion, interlocutory motion, motion for a more definite statement, motion for a new trial, motion for a nonsuit, motion for a decree, motion for judgment, motion for judgment notwithstanding verdict, motion for reargument, motion for summary judgment, motion papers, motion to dismiss, motion to quash, motion to set aside judgment, motion to strike, motion to vacate a judgment, omnibus motion, premature motion, renewal of a motion, withdrawal of a motion II index application, call (appeal), campaign, circulation, course, overture, petition, prayer, procedure, proposal (suggestion), recommendation, request, suggestion, transition

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


motion
n.
A formal application to the court asking for a rule or order in favor of the applicant, such as a grant of summary judgment, of judgment notwithstanding the verdict, to dismiss a complaint, or a new trial. See also move

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


motion
an application to a court or a meeting.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


motion
A formal request that a judge enter a particular order or ruling in a lawsuit. An oral motion may be made during trial — for example, to strike the testimony of a witness or admit an exhibit. Often, motions are made in writing, accompanied by a written statement explaining the legal reasons why the court should grant the motion. The other party has an opportunity to file a written response, and then the court decides whether to grant or deny the motion. The court may hold a hearing where each party can argue its side, or may decide the issue without a hearing.
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


motion
n.
1 In litigation, a formal request, usually in writing, to a court for specified relief, under applicable procedural rules.
2 In a legislature or other deliberative body, a request for procedural relief made by a member to the chairman or the body at large, under Robert's Rules of Order or other applicable procedural rules.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


motion
A written or oral application made to a court or judge to obtain a ruling or order directing that some act be done in favor of the applicant. The applicant is known as the moving party, or the movant.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


motion
I
A written or oral application made to a court or judge to obtain a ruling or order directing that some act be done in favor of the applicant. The applicant is known as the moving party, or the movant.
II An application made to a court or judge which requests a ruling or order in favor of the applicant.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

motion
n.
   a formal request made to a judge for an order or judgment. Motions are made in court all the time for many purposes: to continue (postpone) a trial to a later date, to get a modification of an order, for temporary child support, for a judgment, for dismissal of the opposing party's case, for a rehearing, for sanctions (payment of the moving party's costs or attorney's fees), or for dozens of other purposes. Most motions require a written petition, a written brief of legal reasons for granting the motion (often called "points and authorities"), written notice to the attorney for the opposing party and a hearing before a judge. However, during a trial or a hearing, an oral motion may be permitted.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • motion — [ mosjɔ̃ ] n. f. • XIIIe; lat. motio 1 ♦ Vx Action de mouvoir (⇒ impulsion); mouvement. ♢ (sens repris au XXe) Psychan. Motion pulsionnelle : la pulsion en tant que modification psychique (pulsion en acte). 2 ♦ (1775; angl. motion) Mod …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Motion — Mo tion, n. [F., fr. L. motio, fr. movere, motum, to move. See {Move}.] 1. The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; opposed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Motion — may refer to: Motion (physics), any movement or change in position or place .... Motion (legal), a procedural device in law to bring a limited, contested matter before a court Motion (democracy), a formal step to introduce a matter for… …   Wikipedia

  • motion — n Motion, movement, move, locomotion, stir mean the act or an instance of moving. Motion is the appropriate term in abstract use for the act or process of moving, without regard to what moves or is moved; in philosophical and aesthetic use it is… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • motion — mo‧tion [ˈməʊʆn ǁ ˈmoʊ ] noun [countable] a suggestion that is made formally at a meeting and then decided on by voting: • The motion was carried (= accepted ) by 15 votes to 10. • I d like to propose a motion to move the weekly meetings to… …   Financial and business terms

  • Motion — Mo tion, v. t. 1. To direct or invite by a motion, as of the hand or head; as, to motion one to a seat. [1913 Webster] 2. To propose; to move. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] I want friends to motion such a matter. Burton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • motion — [n1] movement, action act, advance, agitation, ambulation, body English*, change, changing, direction, drift, dynamics, flow, fluctuation, flux, full swing*, gesticulation, gesture, high sign*, inclination, kinetics, locomotion, mobility,… …   New thesaurus

  • motion — [mō′shən] n. [ME mocioun < L motio (gen. motionis), a moving < motus, pp. of movere,MOVE] 1. the act or process of moving; passage of a body from one place to another; movement 2. the act of moving the body or any of its parts 3. a… …   English World dictionary

  • Motion — Mo tion, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Motioned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Motioning}.] 1. To make a significant movement or gesture, as with the hand; as, to motion to one to take a seat. [1913 Webster] 2. To make proposal; to offer plans. [Obs.] Shak. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • motion — A request filed with the Court for a specific action to be taken. (Bernstein s Dictionary of Bankruptcy Terminology) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012. motion A request filed with the Court for a specific action to be taken …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

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