offense
of·fense or of·fence /ə-'fens/ n
1: a violation of the law; esp: a criminal act
nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardyU.S. Constitution amend. V see also lesser included offense
2 in the civil law of Louisiana: an intentional unlawful act that causes damage to another and for which the law imposes an obligation for damages compare quasi contract at contract, quasi-offense
◇ Breach of contract, offenses, quasi-offenses, and quasi contracts are the bases for civil liability under the civil law. Offenses and quasi-offenses are comparable to common-law torts.

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

offense
I noun aggression, assault, attack, breach, breach of the law, breaking of the law, crime, criminal act, criminal deed, criminality, delict, delictum, delinquency, disobedience, encroachment, evil behavior, evil deed, failure, felony, illegal act, illegal conduct, illegality, impropriety, infraction, infringement, injury, inobservance, law-breaking, lawlessness, malefaction, malfeasance, malpractice, malversation, misconduct, misdeed, misdemeanor, misdoing, misfeasance, misprision, noncompliance, nonobservance, offensio, official misconduct, omission, outrage, pecability, peccatum. transgression, umbrage, unlawful act, unrighteousness, violation, violation of law, violation of orders, wrong, wrongdoing, wrongfulness associated concepts: bailable offense, capital offense, charged with an offense, compound offense, continuing offense, degree of offense, grave offense, lesser offense, minor offense, offense against public decency, offense at common law, petty offense, prior offense, public offense foreign phrases:
- Peccata contra naturam sunt gravisslma. — Crimes against nature are the most heinous
II index assault, crime, delict, delinquency (misconduct), disrespect, exception (objection), felony, foray, guilt, indiscretion, infraction, injury, injustice, misconduct, misdeed, misdemeanor, misdoing, misfeasance, misprision, onset (assault), provocation, resentment, transgression, umbrage, violation, wrong

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


offense
n.
An illegal act; an act that violates criminal laws; a felony or misdemeanor.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


offense
A violation of the law, a crime. Often used when describing lesser crimes, as when the jury convicts the defendant of a "lesser offense" than the one charged.
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


offense
n. Any violation of the law for which the judicial code demands there be a penalty, including misdemeanors and felonies.
See also crime.
@ anticipatory offense
One of the three crimes (attempt, conspiracy, solicitation) that are steps toward the commission of another crime. Also called anticipatory crime, inchoate offense, and inchoate crime.
@
-inchoate offense

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


offense
A breach of law; a crime.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


offense
A breach of law; a crime.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

offense
n.
   a crime or punishable violation of law of any type or magnitude.
   See also: crime

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • offense — [ ɔfɑ̃s ] n. f. • v. 1225; estre en offense de « être coupable de » fin XIIe; lat. offensa 1 ♦ Parole ou action qui offense, qui blesse qqn dans son honneur, dans sa dignité. ⇒ affront, injure, insulte, outrage. « Plus l offenseur est cher, et… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • offensé — offense [ ɔfɑ̃s ] n. f. • v. 1225; estre en offense de « être coupable de » fin XIIe; lat. offensa 1 ♦ Parole ou action qui offense, qui blesse qqn dans son honneur, dans sa dignité. ⇒ affront, injure, insulte, outrage. « Plus l offenseur est… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • offense — 1 offensive, aggression, *attack Analogous words: assault, *attack, onslaught, onset 2 Offense, resentment, umbrage, pique, dudgeon, huff are comparable when they mean a person s emotional reaction to what he regards as a slight, an affront, an… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • offense — OFFENSE. s. f. Injure de fait ou de parole. Grande offense, griéve offense. offense mortelle. legere offense. offense irréparable. offense faite au Prince en la personne de son Ambassadeur. faire une offense à quelqu un. souffrir une offense.… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Offense — Of*fense , Offence Of*fence , n. [F., fr. L. offensa. See {Offend}.] 1. The act of offending in any sense; esp., a crime or a sin, an affront or an injury. [1913 Webster] Who was delivered for our offenses, and was raised again for our… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • offensé — offensé, ée (o fan sé, sée) part. passé d offenser. 1°   Qui a reçu une offense. •   Appréhende du moins la colère d une femme offensée, MOL. Festin, I, 3. •   Épicure avait raison de dire que les offenses étaient supportables à un homme sage ;… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • offense — [ə fens′; ] also, and for n. 7 always, [ô′fens΄] n. [ME < MFr < L offensa < pp. of offendere: see OFFEND] 1. an offending; specif., a) the act of breaking a law; sin or crime; transgression b) the act of creating resentment, hurt… …   English World dictionary

  • Offense — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Offense en directo OFFENSE son una banda proveniente de Valencia (España) que se formaron a finales de 1990,cuando cinco tíos llamados Fede,Wensho,Murgui,Javi y Loren,decidieron juntarse para ensayar. En febrero del… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Offense — or Offence (see ce/ se) may refer to: Offence (law), a violation of the penal law Offense (sports), the action of engaging an opposing team with the objective of scoring Offense (policy debate), arguments that make a definite value judgment about …   Wikipedia

  • offense — LAW the US spelling of offence * * * offense UK US /əˈfens/ noun US ► OFFENCE(Cf. ↑offence) …   Financial and business terms

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