perjury
per·ju·ry /'pər-jə-rē/ n pl -ries [Anglo-French perjurie parjurie, from Latin perjurium, from perjurus deliberately giving false testimony, from per- detrimental to + jur- jus law]: the act or crime of knowingly making a false statement (as about a material matter) while under oath or bound by an affirmation or other officially prescribed declaration that what one says, writes, or claims is true compare false swearing

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

perjury
I noun act of oath-breaking, distortion of the truth, false statement, false swearing, falsehood, falseness, falsification, intentional misstatement, invention of lies, misrepresentation, misstatement, periurium, perversion of truth, prevarication, untruth, violation of an oath, willful distortion of the truth, willful falsehood, willful telling of a falsehood, willful telling of a lie associated concepts: subornation of perjury foreign phrases:
- Lex punit mendacium. — The law punishes mendacity
- Perjuri sunt qui servatis verbis juramenti dedpiunt aures eorum qui accipiunt. — They are perjured, who, preserving the words of an oath, deceive the ears of those who receive it
- Sacramentum si fatuum fuerit, licet falsum, tamen non committit peijurium. — A foolish oath, although false, does not give rise to perjury
- Qui non libere veritatem pronunciat proditor est veritatis. — He who does not freely speak the truth is a betrayer of the truth
II index deceit, dishonesty, falsification, fiction, hypocrisy, misstatement, subreption

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


perjury
n.
The crime of intentionally lying under oath during a judicial proceeding, such as at trial.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


perjury
false swearing. The crime of judicial affirmation of falsehood upon oath or affirmation equivalent to oath. There needs to be a denial of what is true or an assertion of what is false. The statements complained of must be pertinent to the issue that was originally being tried.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


perjury
The crime of intentionally lying after being duly sworn to tell the truth by a notary public, court clerk, or other official. This false statement may be made in testimony in court, administrative hearings, depositions, or answers to interrogatories, as well as by signing or acknowledging a written legal document (such as an affidavit, declaration under penalty of perjury, deed, license application, or tax return) known to contain false information.
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


perjury
n. The criminal offense of making false statements under oath, especially in a legal document or during a legal proceeding.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


perjury
A crime that occurs when an individual willfully makes a false statement during a judicial proceeding, after he or she has taken an oath to speak the truth.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


perjury
I
A crime that occurs when an individual willfully makes a false statement during a judicial proceeding, after he or she has taken an oath to speak the truth.
II The criminal offense of making a false statement under oath.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

perjury
n.
   the crime of intentionally lying after being duly sworn (to tell the truth) by a notary public, court clerk or other official. This false statement may be made in testimony in court, administrative hearings, depositions, answers to interrogatories, as well as by signing or acknowledging a written legal document (such as affidavit, declaration under penalty of perjury, deed, license application, tax return) known to contain false information. Although it is a crime, prosecutions for perjury are rare, because a defendant will argue he/she merely made a mistake or misunderstood.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Perjury — Perjury, also known as forswearing, is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. It is important that the false… …   Wikipedia

  • Perjury — • The crime and sin of taking a false oath Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Perjury     Perjury     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • perjury — per‧ju‧ry [ˈpɜːdʒəri ǁ ˈpɜːr ] noun [uncountable] LAW the crime of telling a lie after promising to tell the truth in a court of law: • A company official committed perjury during the trial. * * * perjury UK US /ˈpɜːdʒəri/ noun [U] ► LAW the… …   Financial and business terms

  • Perjury — Per ju*ry, n.; pl. {Perjuries}. [L. perjurium. See {Perjure}, v.] 1. False swearing. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) At common law, a willfully false statement in a fact material to the issue, made by a witness under oath in a competent judicial… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • perjury — late 14c., act of swearing to a statement known to be false, via Anglo Fr. parjurie (late 13c.) and O.Fr. parjurie, both from L. perjurium false oath, from perjurare swear falsely, from per away, entirely (see PER (Cf. per)) + jurare to swear… …   Etymology dictionary

  • perjury — [n] lying while under oath deceitfulness, deception, dishonesty, falsehood, false oath, false swearing, false testimony, falsification, untruth, untruthfulness; concepts 63,278 …   New thesaurus

  • perjury — ► NOUN Law ▪ the offence of deliberately telling an untruth in court when under oath …   English terms dictionary

  • perjury — [pʉr′jə rē] n. pl. perjuries [ME < OFr parjurie < L perjurium < perjurus, false, breaking oath < per, through + jus (gen. juris), a right, justice: see JURY1] 1. the willful telling of a lie while under lawful oath or affirmation to… …   English World dictionary

  • perjury — perjurious /peuhr joor ee euhs/, adj. perjuriously, adv. perjuriousness, n. /perr jeuh ree/, n., pl. perjuries. Law. the willful giving of false testimony under oath or affirmation, before a competent tribunal, upon a point material to a legal… …   Universalium

  • PERJURY — Witnesses are guilty of perjury if it is proved, by the evidence of at least two other competent and consistent witnesses, that they had not been present at the time and at the place where they had testified to have been when the event in issue… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

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