constraining force
index pressure

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006

Look at other dictionaries:

  • force — 1 n 1: a cause of motion, activity, or change intervening force: a force that acts after another s negligent act or omission has occurred and that causes injury to another: intervening cause at cause irresistible force: an unforeseeable event esp …   Law dictionary

  • force — n 1 *power, energy, strength, might, puissance Analogous words: *stress, strain, pressure, tension: *speed, velocity, momentum, impetus, headway 2 Force, violence, compulsion, coercion, duress, constraint, restraint denote the exercise or the… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • constraining power — index force (compulsion) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Constraining — Constrain Con*strain , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Constrained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Constraining}.] [OF. constraindre, F. contrainde, L. constringere; con + stringere to draw tight. See {Strain}, and. cf. {Constrict}, {Constringe}.] 1. To secure by bonds; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • force — Power, violence, compulsion, or constraint exerted upon or against a person or thing. Landry v. Daley, D.C.I11., 280 F.Supp. 938, 954. Power dynamically considered, that is, in motion or in action; constraining power, compulsion; strength… …   Black's law dictionary

  • force — Power, violence, compulsion, or constraint exerted upon or against a person or thing. Landry v. Daley, D.C.I11., 280 F.Supp. 938, 954. Power dynamically considered, that is, in motion or in action; constraining power, compulsion; strength… …   Black's law dictionary

  • constraining — con·strain || kÉ™n streɪn v. compel, force, oblige, coerce …   English contemporary dictionary

  • pressure — I noun anxiety, anxiousness, brunt, brute force, burden, coercion, compulsion, constraining force, constraint, controlling power, crisis, drive, duress, encumbrance, exertion, exhortation, exigency, force, hardship, heaviness, hindrance,… …   Law dictionary

  • stress — I. noun Etymology: Middle English stresse stress, distress, short for destresse more at distress Date: 14th century 1. constraining force or influence: as a. a force exerted when one body or body part presses on, pulls on, pushes against, or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Pythagoreans and Eleatics — Edward Hussey PYTHAGORAS AND THE EARLY PYTHAGOREANS Pythagoras, a native of Samos, emigrated to southern Italy around 520, and seems to have established himself in the city of Croton. There he founded a society of people sharing his beliefs and… …   History of philosophy

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