picketing
Under Section 20 of the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992, trade union immunity does not apply in the event of secondary action; i.e. action other than against the employer in question. However under Section 220 of the Act, picketing is allowed and does not prejudice immunity if it is lawful. It is lawful, in contemplation or furtherance of an industrial dispute, for a person to attend at or near his place of work or, if a union official, at or near a member's place of work, peacefully to obtain or communicate information or to use peaceful persuasion.

Easyform Glossary of Law Terms. — UK law terms.


picketing
n.
The act of participating in a picket.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


picketing
from the French for 'pike', this describes the practice of placing strikers between the worker and his place of work to stop him coming off strike or to encourage him to go on strike. Almost a century of oscillating legislation controls the practice in the UK. Generally, it is permitted if carried out peacefully and with a view to communicating information or persuading persons and is carried out at a person's own place of work. This latter phrase prevents picketing outside the target's garden and restrained the flying picket, someone who would go anywhere to help out workers in a strike even though he himself might not have any dispute with the target. Secondary picketing, where suppliers of the target become themselves targets, is prohibited. While the law generally does not prohibit peaceful picketing, it has not created a right to picket; a picket standing in front of a lorry and obstructing it peacefully to communicate with the driver commits the offence of obstruction: Broome v. DPP [1974] ICR 84. Picketing also must be in accordance with the golden formulae. Many pickets are not illegal simply for that reason: a code of practice issued by the Secretary of State indicates that there should be no more than six pickets at any entrance.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


picketing
Protesting, typically by standing outside of a business or workplace to publicize a dispute or incident occuring there. Sometimes, picketers want to persuade others not to enter the place they are picketing (as might be the case with workers on strike or antiabortion protesters outside of an abortion clinic). Picketing may also happen online, as when IBM's campus on the Second Life website was picketed by avatars of IBM employees.
Category: Employment Law & HR → Employee Rights
Category: Employment Law & HR → Human Resources

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

picketing
The action of workers, usually during a strike, seeking to protest against the employer's acts or omission and persuade other workers not to work. It may only be lawful if done peacefully at the employees' own place of work during a trade dispute, in order to persuade others not to work or communicate information about the trade dispute. Picketing another's place of work it is secondary picketing and is unlawful.
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Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.


picketing
n. A common practice in labor disputes, in which employees patrol with signs on their fronts and backs (sandwich signs) or on wooden stakes held over their shoulders. Peaceful picketing is protected as free expression, except where considered a threat to public safety or when spreading false propaganda.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


picketing
The presence at an employer's business of one or more employees and/or other persons who are publicizing a labor dispute, influencing employees or customers to withhold their work or business, respectively, or showing a union's desire to represent employees; picketing is usually accompanied by patrolling with signs.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


picketing
The presence at an employer's business of one or more employees and/or other persons who are publicizing a labor dispute, influencing employees or customers to withhold their work or business, respectively, or showing a union's desire to represent employees; picketing is usually accompanied by patrolling with signs.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

picketing
n.
   standing or parading near a business or government office usually with signs of protest or claims in labor disputes or public policy controversies (peace marches to pro- or anti-abortion advocates). Picketing is constitutionally guaranteed as free speech, but in some cases it may be limited by court order to prevent physical combat, blocking of entrances or threats to the public safety.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • picketing — Term refers to presence at an employer s business by one or more employees and/or other persons to publicize labor dispute, influence employees or customers to withhold their work or business, respectively, or show union s desire to represent… …   Black's law dictionary

  • picketing — Ⅰ. picket UK US /ˈpɪkɪt/ noun [C] HR, WORKPLACE ► (also picket line) a group of people who stand outside an organization s building holding signs to protest against something. The people who protest are often employees who disagree with the… …   Financial and business terms

  • picketing — n. informational picketing (esp. AE); mass picketing * * * [ pɪkɪtɪŋ] mass picketing informational picketing (esp. AE) …   Combinatory dictionary

  • picketing — A form of industrial action in which employees gather outside a workplace in which there is a trade dispute, usually a strike. The pickets so gathered often form a picket line, past which they attempt to discourage other workers, delivery lorries …   Big dictionary of business and management

  • picketing — Act by workers of standing in front of or near a workplace to call attention to their grievances, discourage patronage, and, during strikes, to discourage strikebreakers. Picketing is also used in non work related protests. The U.S. Norris… …   Universalium

  • picketing — Securing an aircraft when it is parked in the open. An aircraft may be picketed with the mooring rings that are built into the pavement. The aircraft also may be picketed to the movable and above ground picketing blocks. These are heavy blocks… …   Aviation dictionary

  • Picketing — Picket Pick et, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Picketed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Picketing}.] 1. To fortify with pointed stakes. [1913 Webster] 2. To inclose or fence with pickets or pales. [1913 Webster] 3. To tether to, or as to, a picket; as, to picket a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • picketing —    Standing or marching near a business or office, usually with protest signs or banners, as part of a labor dispute or political controversy. Picketing is constitutionally guaranteed as free speech, but may be limited by court order to prevent… …   Business law dictionary

  • picketing — A method of promoting a strike or boycott. The establishment and maintenance of an organized esponiage upon the works of an employer and upon persons going to and from them. Thomas v Indianapolis, 195 Ind 440, 145 NE 440, 35 ALR 1194. The… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • picketing — verb (Protesting by a labour union or other group.) …   Wiktionary

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