precatory
prec·a·to·ry /'pre-kə-ˌtōr-ē/ adj: expressing a wish or desire but not creating a legal obligation or affirmative duty
a precatory remark
the precatory words
◇ When interpreting wills, courts will look to whether a direction is precatory or mandatory in carrying out the testator's intent. Thus, courts generally will not construe language to create a trust if the language is only precatory and there is no evidence that the language was intended to create a trust. Words such as with the hope that or it is my wish that are often considered precatory.

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

precatory
adjective advisory, appealing, asking, beseeching, entreating, expressing entreaty, imploratory, imploring, importunate, pleading, suggesting, suggestive associated concepts: precatory words

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


precatory
adj.
Expressing a request, wish, or recommendation, as when a testator expresses a wish in his or her will.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


precatory
Suggested or recommended, but not binding. For example, language in a will or trust that says "I hope my daughter will keep the house in the family" is precatory and not legally binding on the daughter who inherits the house.
Category: Wills, Trusts & Estates → Living Trusts & Avoiding Probate
Category: Wills, Trusts & Estates → Wills

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


precatory
adj. Expressing a desire for, requesting, or advising action, but usually in a nonbinding way, such as, "it is my desire and wish to . . . ." Precatory words are often used in wills and similar documents.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.

precatory
adj.
   referring to a wish or advisory suggestion which does not have the force of a demand or a request which under the law must be obeyed. Thus "precatory words" in a will or trust would express a "hope that my daughter will keep the house in the family," but do not absolutely prevent her from selling it.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • precatory — 1630s, from L.L. precatorius, from precatorem one who prays, agent noun from precari to pray (see PRAY (Cf. pray)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • precatory — [prek′ətivprek′ə tôr΄ē] adj. [LL precatorius < L precari, to PRAY] of, having the nature of, or expressing entreaty: also precative [prek′ətiv] …   English World dictionary

  • Precatory — Precative Prec a*tive, Precatory Prec a*to*ry, a. [L. precativus, precatorius, fr. precari to pray. See {Precarious}.] Suppliant; beseeching. Bp. Hopkins. [1913 Webster] {Precatory words} (Law), words of recommendation, request, entreaty, wish,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • precatory — vaistinis abras statusas T sritis vardynas apibrėžtis Pupinių šeimos vaistinis nuodingas augalas (Abrus precatorius), paplitęs atogrąžose, naudojamas papuošalams gaminti. atitikmenys: lot. Abrus precatorius angl. coral beadplant; crab s eye;… …   Lithuanian dictionary (lietuvių žodynas)

  • precatory — /prek euh tawr ee, tohr ee/, adj. of, pertaining to, characterized by, or expressing entreaty or supplication: precatory overtures. Also, precative /prek euh tiv/. [1630 40; < LL precatorius, equiv. to L preca(ri) to PRAY, entreat + torius TORY1] …   Universalium

  • precatory — adjective a) Expressing a wish. December 8. . . . A precatory letter from Gillies. I must do Molière for him, I suppose; but it is wonderful that knowing the situation I am in, the poor fellow presses so hard. b) Expressing a wish but not… …   Wiktionary

  • precatory — prec•a•to•ry [[t]ˈprɛk əˌtɔr i, ˌtoʊr i[/t]] also prec′a•tive adj. pertaining to or expressive of entreaty or supplication: precatory overtures[/ex] • Etymology: 1630–40; < LL precātōrius= L precā(rī) to pray, entreat + tōrius tory I …   From formal English to slang

  • precatory — adjective expressing entreaty or supplication precatory overtures • Syn: ↑precative • Similar to: ↑beseeching, ↑pleading, ↑imploring …   Useful english dictionary

  • precatory — adjective Etymology: Late Latin precatorius, from Latin precari to pray more at pray Date: 1636 expressing a wish …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • precatory — prekÉ™tÉ”rɪ / trɪ adj. expressing a request, supplicatory, comprising an entreatment …   English contemporary dictionary

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