probation
pro·ba·tion /prō-'bā-shən/ n [Middle French, critical examination and evaluation, from Latin probation- probatio, from probare to test, approve, prove]
1 a: subjection to a period of evaluation and possible termination at the commencement of employment in a position for which one's fitness is to be determined
b: subjection to a period of review in the course of employment or education as a result of a violation of standards and with the possibility of dismissal if standards are not met
2 a: the suspension of all or part of a sentence and its replacement by freedom subject to specific conditions and the supervision of a probation officer
it is the intent of the legislature that the granting of probation shall be a matter of grace conferring no vested right to its continuanceMichigan Statutes Annotated compare diversion, parole
b: probation as a sentence in itself
c: the period or state of being subject to probation
arrested while on probation
pro·ba·tion·al /-shə-nəl/ adj
pro·ba·tion·al·ly adv
pro·ba·tion·ary /-shə-ˌner-ē/ adj

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

probation
I noun conditional suspension of sentence, exemption, freedom, liberation, parole, period of testing, period of trial, probatio, release associated concepts: parole, probation term, probationary employee, revocation of probation II index examination (test), preparation

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


probation
n.
A sentencing procedure in which, instead of imprisoning a person convicted of a crime, the court releases him or her to the supervision of a probation officer, with the understanding that a violation of the terms of probation will result in a prison sentence.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


probation
A type of sentence for a criminal offense. The probationer (convicted person) is sentenced to jail, but that sentence is suspended for a period of months or years while the probationer is released into the community subject to certain conditions of behavior. Common conditions of probation include performing public service work, paying a fine, maintaining good behavior, receiving therapeutic services, paying restitution to a victim, and reporting regularly to a probation officer. If the probationer fails to comply with the conditions of probation, the probation office may have the person arrested and brought before a judge for a probation hearing. A judge who finds that probation conditions have not been met can revoke probation and impose the original sentence. Compare: parole
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


probation
n. A procedure following conviction that permits the party found guilty to be released without doing prison time, subject to conditions that are placed upon him or her by the court. Violation of any of those conditions can lead to probation being revoked and the person being remanded to confinement.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


probation
A sentence whereby a convict is released from confinement but is still under court supervision; a testing or a trial period. Probation can be given in lieu of a prison term or can suspend a prison sentence if the convict has consistently demonstrated good behavior.
The status of a convicted person who is given some freedom on the condition that for a specified period he or she act in a manner approved by a special officer to whom the person must report.
An initial period of employment during which a new, transferred, or promoted employee must show the ability to perform the required duties.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


probation
I
A sentence whereby a convict is released from confinement but is still under court supervision; a testing or a trial period. Probation can be given in lieu of a prison term or can suspend a prison sentence if the convict has consistently demonstrated good behavior.
 
The status of a convicted person who is given some freedom on the condition that for a specified period he or she act in a manner approved by a special officer to whom the person must report.
 
An initial period of employment during which a new, transferred, or promoted employee must show the ability to perform the required duties.
II An alternative to imprisonment allowing a person found guilty of an offense to stay in the community, usually under conditions and under the supervision of a probation officer. A violation of probation can lead to its revocation and to imprisonment.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

probation
n.
   a chance to remain free (or serve only a short time) given by a judge to a person convicted of a crime instead of being sent to jail or prison, provided the person can be good. Probation is only given under specific court-ordered terms, such as performing public service work, staying away from liquor, paying a fine, maintaining good behavior, getting mental therapy and reporting regularly to a probation officer. Violation of probation terms will usually result in the person being sent to jail for the normal term. Repeat criminals are normally not eligible for probation. Probation is not the same as "parole," which is freedom under certain restrictions given to convicts at the end of their imprisonment.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Probation — is the suspension of all or part of a jail sentence; the criminal who is on probation has been convicted of a crime, but instead of serving jail time, has been found by the Court to be amenable to probation and will be returned to the community… …   Wikipedia

  • probation — [ prɔbasjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1549; « épreuve » 1350; lat. probatio, de probare « prouver » 1 ♦ Relig. Temps du noviciat religieux. Année de probation. Temps d épreuve qui précède le noviciat. 2 ♦ Dr. pén. Mise à l épreuve des délinquants sous le… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • probation — pro‧ba‧tion [prəˈbeɪʆn ǁ proʊ ] noun [uncountable] 1. HUMAN RESOURCES a period of time during which a new employee is tested to make sure they are suitable for a job: • At the end of the year I can pass or fail or have my probation extended. •… …   Financial and business terms

  • Probation — Pro*ba tion, n. [L. probatio, fr. probare to try, examine, prove: cf. F. probation. See {Prove}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of proving; also, that which proves anything; proof. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] When by miracle God dispensed great gifts to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • probation — Probation, Approbatio. Ceux qui sont en l an de probation, Catechumeni, B. Faire son an de probation, Iusta catecheseos implere, B …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • probation — Probation. s. f. v. On appelle ainsi les Pratiques d un Ordre Religieux, ausquelles on exerce les Novices avant que de les recevoir à Profession. Faire une année de probation. pendant son année de probation …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • probation — [prō bā′shən] n. [ME probacion < OFr < L probatio < probare, to prove: see PROBE] 1. a testing or trial, as of a person s character, ability to meet requirements, etc. 2. the suspension of sentence of a person convicted but not yet… …   English World dictionary

  • Probation — (lat.), Probe, Beweis, Beweisführung …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Probation — Probatiōn (lat.), Prüfung, Bewährung …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • probation — (n.) early 15c., trial, experiment, test, from O.Fr. probacion (14c.), from L. probationem (nom. probatio) inspection, examination, noun of action from pp. stem of probare to test (see PROVE (Cf. prove)). Meaning testing of a person s conduct is… …   Etymology dictionary

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