proffer
I verb adduce, advance, advertise, bid, bring forward, donate, extend, give, hold out, invite, lay before, make a bid, make a motion, make an offer, make an overture, make possible, move, offer, prefer, present, promise, promittere, propose, propound, put forward, put up, render, set forth, submit, suggest, tender, volunteer II index adduce, bestow, bid, contribute (supply), extend (offer), give (grant), hold out (deliberate on an offer), introduce, invitation, offer (propose), offer (tender), overture, pose (propound), present (make a gift), proposal (suggestion), propose, propound, remit (submit for consideration), tender

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


proffer
v.
To offer; to offer or hold out something as proof or evidence.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


proffer
To offer evidence for admission at trial.
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


proffer
v. A preliminary offering, specifically with regard to testimony or evidence, a preview of what will be said or shown. Also known as an offer of proof.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


proffer
To offer or tender, as, the production of a document and offer of the same in evidence.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


proffer
To offer or tender, as, the production of a document and offer of the same in evidence.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

proffer
v.
   to offer evidence in a trial.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Proffer — Prof fer, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Proffered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Proffering}.] [OE. profren, proferen, F. prof[ e]rer, fr. L. proferre to bring forth or forward, to offer; pro forward + ferre to bring. See {Bear} to produce.] 1. To offer for… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Proffer — Prof fer, n. 1. An offer made; something proposed for acceptance by another; a tender; as, proffers of peace or friendship. [1913 Webster] He made a proffer to lay down his commission. Clarendon. [1913 Webster] 2. Essay; attempt. [R.] Bacon.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • proffer — [präf′ər] vt. [ME profren < Anglo Fr & OFr proffrir < poroffrir < por , PRO 2 + offrir < VL * offerire, for L offerre, to OFFER] to offer (usually something intangible) [to proffer friendship] n. [ME & Anglo Fr profre < the v.] an… …   English World dictionary

  • proffer — (v.) late 13c., from Anglo Fr. profrier (mid 13c.), O.Fr. poroffrir (c.1080), from por forth (from L. pro ) + offrir to offer, from L. offerre (see OFFER (Cf. offer)). Related: Proffered; proffering …   Etymology dictionary

  • proffer — *offer, tender, present, prefer Analogous words: propose, design, intend: confer, bestow, present, *give Contrasted words: reject, spurn, refuse, *decline …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • proffer — meaning ‘to offer (a gift or service)’, has inflected forms proffered, proffering …   Modern English usage

  • proffer — [v] suggest, offer extend, gift, give, hand, hit on, hold out, make a pitch*, pose, present, propose, proposition, propound, submit, tender, volunteer; concepts 66,67,75 Ant. discourage, dissuade, take back …   New thesaurus

  • proffer — ► VERB ▪ offer for acceptance. ORIGIN Old French proffrir, from Latin pro before + offerre to offer …   English terms dictionary

  • Proffer — To proffer (sometimes profer) means to offer evidence in support of an argument, or elements of an affirmative defense or offense, often at trial. A party with the burden of proof must proffer sufficient evidence to carry that burden.For example …   Wikipedia

  • proffer — 1. noun a) An offer made; something proposed for acceptance by another; a tender; as, proffers of peace or friendship. b) Essay; attempt. 2. verb a) …   Wiktionary

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