promissory estoppel
promissory estoppel see estoppel 1

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

promissory estoppel
n.
A condition that arises when someone promises something to another person who relies on that promise and takes action that would hurt him or her if the promise is not kept; a court will find that such a promise is binding if there is no other way to avoid injustice to the injured party.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


promissory estoppel

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


promissory estoppel
A legal principle that prevents a person who made a promise from reneging when someone else has reasonably relied on the promise and will suffer a loss if the promise is broken. (See also: estoppel)
Category: Representing Yourself in Court
Category: Small Claims Court
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits
Category: Working With a Lawyer

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


promissory estoppel
In the law of contracts, the doctrine that provides that if a party changes his or her position substantially either by acting or forbearing from acting in reliance upon a gratuitous promise, then that party can enforce the promise although the essential elements of a contract are not present.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


promissory estoppel
I
In the law of contracts, the doctrine that provides that if a party changes his or her position substantially either by acting or forbearing from acting in reliance upon a gratuitous promise, then that party can enforce the promise although the essential elements of a contract are not present.
II A promise which estops the promisee from asserting or taking certain action.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

promissory estoppel
n.
   a false statement treated as a promise by a court when the listener had relied on what was told to him/her to his/her disadvantage. In order to see that justice is done a judge will preclude the maker of the statement from denying it. Thus, the legal inability of the person who made the false statement to deny it makes it an enforceable promise called "promissory estoppel," or an "equitable estoppel." Example: Bernie Blowhard tells Arthur Artist that Blowhard has a contract to make a movie and wants Artist to paint the background scenery in return for a percentage of the profits. Artist paints, and Blowhard then admits he needed the scenery to try to get a movie deal which fell through and there are no profits to share. Artist sues and the judge finds that Blowhard cannot deny a contract with Artist and gives Artist judgment for the value of his work.
   See also: estoppel

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Promissory Estoppel — The legal principle that a promise is enforceable by law when the promisor (person making the promise) makes a promise to the promisee (person being promised) who relies on it to his or her detriment. A promissory estoppel is intended to stop the …   Investment dictionary

  • promissory estoppel — A new name for an established doctrine. The principle that an estoppel may arise from the making of a promise, even though without consideration, if it was intended that the promise should be relied upon and in fact it was relied upon, and if a… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Estoppel — in its broadest sense is a legal term referring to a series of legal and equitable doctrines that preclude a person from denying or asserting anything to the contrary of that which has, in contemplation of law, been established as the truth,… …   Wikipedia

  • Estoppel (English law) — Estoppel is a legal doctrine that may be used in certain situations to prevent a person from relying upon certain rights, or upon a set of facts (eg. words said or actions performed) which is different from an earlier set of facts. Estoppel could …   Wikipedia

  • estoppel — es·top·pel /e stä pəl/ n [probably from Middle French estoupail plug, stopper, from estouper to stop up see estop] 1: a bar to the use of contradictory words or acts in asserting a claim or right against another; esp: equitable estoppel in this… …   Law dictionary

  • promissory — prom·is·so·ry / prä mə ˌsōr ē/ adj: containing or conveying a promise or assurance promissory terms Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. promissory …   Law dictionary

  • promissory — /promas(6)riy/ Containing or consisting of a promise; in the nature of a promise; stipulating or engaging for a future act or course of conduct. As to promissory oath promissory representation promissory warranty, see those titles @ promissory… …   Black's law dictionary

  • estoppel — /AstopAl/ Estoppel means that party is prevented by his own acts from claiming a right to detriment of other party who was entitled to rely on such conduct and has acted accordingly. Graham v. Asbury, 112 Ariz. 184, 540 P.2d 656, 658. A principle …   Black's law dictionary

  • estoppel — /AstopAl/ Estoppel means that party is prevented by his own acts from claiming a right to detriment of other party who was entitled to rely on such conduct and has acted accordingly. Graham v. Asbury, 112 Ariz. 184, 540 P.2d 656, 658. A principle …   Black's law dictionary

  • estoppel — A bar which stoppeth a person or closes up his mouth to allege or plead what actually may be the truth. 2 Coke, Littleton 352a. A bar which precludes a person from denying or asserting anything to the contrary of that which has, in contemplation… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

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