recuse
re·cuse /ri-'kyüz/ vt re·cused, re·cus·ing [Anglo-French recuser to refuse, from Middle French, from Latin recusare, from re- back + causari to give a reason, from causa cause, reason]
1: to challenge or object to (as a judge) as having prejudice or a conflict of interest
2: to disqualify (as oneself or another judge or official) for a proceeding by a judicial act because of prejudice or conflict of interest
an order recusing the district attorney from any proceeding may be appealed by the district attorney or the Attorney GeneralCalifornia Penal Code
re·cuse·ment n

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

recuse
v.
For a judge to withdraw from hearing a lawsuit because of self-interest, bias, or other inability to render a fair and impartial decision; to object to a judge or jury on the grounds that he or she will not be impartial.
n.
recusal

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


recuse
See: recusal
Category: Accidents & Injuries
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits
Category: Working With a Lawyer

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


recuse
v. To remove as a judge from a trial or hearing, because of bias, prejudice, or an interest in the matter being decided; to object to or challenge the qualifications of a judge to hear a case due to a possible conflict of interest.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


recuse
To disqualify or remove oneself as a judge over a particular proceeding because of one's conflict of interest. Recusal, or the judge's act of disqualifying himself or herself from presiding over a proceeding, is based on the maxim that judges are charged with a duty of impartiality in administering justice.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


recuse
I
To disqualify or remove oneself as a judge over a particular proceeding because of one's conflict of interest. Recusal, or the judge's act of disqualifying himself or herself from presiding over a proceeding, is based on the maxim that judges are charged with a duty of impartiality in administering justice.
II The process by which a judge is disqualified from hearing a case, on his or her own motion or upon the objection of either party.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

recuse
v.
   to refuse to be a judge (or for a judge to agree to a request by one of the parties to step aside) in a lawsuit or appeal because of a conflict of interest or other good reason (acquaintanceship with one of the parties, for example). It also applies to a judge or prosecutor being removed or voluntarily removing himself/herself from a criminal case in which he/she has a conflict of interest, such as friendship or known enmity to the defendant.
   See also: recusal

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • récusé — récusé, ée (ré ku zé, zée) part. passé de récuser. Un juré récusé par l accusé …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • recuse — e*cuse (r?*k?z ), v. t. [F. r[ e]cuser, or L. recusare. See {Recusant}.] (Law) To refuse or reject, as a judge; to challenge that the judge shall not try the cause. [Obs.] Sir K. Digby. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • recuse — e*cuse (r?*k?z ), v. i. To withdraw oneself from serving as a judge or other decision maker in order to avoid a real or apparent conflict of interest; often used with the reflexive; as, the judge recused himself due to a financial interest in the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • recuse — late 14c., to reject another s authority as prejudiced, from O.Fr. recuser (13c.), from L. recusare to refuse, make an objection, from re (see RE (Cf. re )) + causa (see CAUSE (Cf. cause)). The word now is used mostly reflectively. Related:… …   Etymology dictionary

  • recusé — Recusé, [recus]ée. part …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • recuse — [ri kyo͞oz′] vt., vi. recused, recusing [ME recusen < MFr recuser < L recusare: see RECUSANT] to disqualify or withdraw from a position of judging, as because of prejudice or personal interest recusal n …   English World dictionary

  • recuse — [rɪ kju:z] verb chiefly N. Amer. & S. African challenge (a judge or juror) as unqualified to perform legal duties because of a possible lack of impartiality. ↘(recuse oneself) excuse oneself from a case for this reason. Derivatives recusal noun… …   English new terms dictionary

  • recuse — transitive verb (recused; recusing) Etymology: Middle English, to refuse, reject, from Anglo French recuser, from Latin recusare Date: 1949 to disqualify (oneself) as judge in a particular case; broadly to remove (oneself) from participation to… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • recuse — recusation /rek yoo zay sheuhn/, n. /ri kyoohz /, v., recused, recusing. v.t. 1. to reject or challenge (a judge or juror) as disqualified to act, esp. because of interest or bias. v.i. 2. to withdraw from a position of judging so as to avoid any …   Universalium

  • recuse — verb a) To refuse or reject (a judge); to challenge that the judge shall not try the case or is disqualified to act. The judge recused herself from that case, citing a possible conflict of interest. b) To refuse to act as a judge; …   Wiktionary

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