remedy
rem·e·dy 1 n pl -dies: the means to enforce a right or to prevent or obtain redress for a wrong: the relief (as damages, restitution, specific performance, or an injunction) that may be given or ordered by a court or other tribunal for a wrong
if the contract is null and void, the remedy is to rescind and to put the parties in the position in which they were prior to the attempted agreementFirst Nat'l Mortgage Corp. v. The Manhattan Life Ins. Co., 360 So. 2d 264 (1978)
specific performance and other equitable remedies
rem·e·di·less adj
remedy 2 vt -died, -dy·ing: to provide or serve as a remedy for

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

remedy
I (legal means of redress) noun aid, alleviation, amelioration, assistance, compensation, corrective measure, counteraction, effective help, help, recompense, rectification, rehabilitation, relief, remedial measure, reparation, reparative measure, restitution, solution associated concepts: adequate remedy at law, ancillary relief, appropriate relief, equitable remedy, exclusive remedy, exhaustion of administrative remedies, extraordinary remedy, inadequate remedy, legal remedy, mutuality of remedy, provisional remedy, statutory remedy II (that which corrects) noun aid, antidote, assistance, correction, corrective measure, cure, help, medicina, palliative, relief, remedial measure, remedium, restorative III verb adjust, aid, alleviate, ameliorate, amend, assist, assuage, attend, calm, change, correct, cure, ease, fix, heal, help, improve, indemnify, make amends, make better, make sound, medicamentum, medicate, medicina, meliorate, mend, minister to, mitigate, mollify, neutralize, overhaul, palliate, put into condition, put into shape, readjust, rectify, redress, reinvigorate, relieve, remedium, renew, repair, restore, resuscitate, retrieve, revise, revive, revivify, right, satisfy, save, set straight, solve, soothe, succor, treat, work a cure IV index adjust (resolve), alleviate, amend, amendment (correction), assuage, correction (change), cure (noun), cure (verb), disabuse, drug, emend, fix (repair), habeas corpus, help (noun), help (verb), panacea, recourse, rectify, redress, reform, regulate (adjust), relief (legal redress), relieve (give aid), remedial statute, repair (noun), repair (verb), reparation (indemnification), reparation (keeping in repair), restore (renew)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


remedy
n.
A means of compensating someone for an injury or enforcing a right.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


remedy
The means of redressing an injury or enforcing a right in a legal action. Remedies may be ordered by the court, granted by judgment after trial or hearing, by agreement between the parties, and by the automatic operation of law. Some remedies require that certain acts be performed or prohibited, others involve payment of money, and still others require a court's declaration of the rights of the parties and an order to honor them.
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


remedy
n. The way a right is enforced or an injury is redressed-most commonly by imposition of monetary damages.
@ extraordinary remedy
A type of remedy that is not usually available, but that is used when it is shown that it is necessary in order to preserve one's rights. Writs of mandamus, prohibition, habeas corpus are examples of such.
=>> remedy.
@ provisional remedy
A temporary remedy that is incidental to a regular legal proceeding, but that is needed to preserve the claimant's rights or to keep same from suffering irreparable harm pending the action's conclusion. Temporary restraining orders, injunctions, attachment, or appointment of receivers are examples of provisional remedies.
=>> remedy.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


remedy
The manner in which a right is enforced or satisfied by a court when some harm or injury, recognized by society as a wrongful act, is inflicted upon an individual.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


remedy
I
The manner in which a right is enforced or satisfied by a court when some harm or injury, recognized by society as a wrongful act, is inflicted upon an individual.
II Legal or judicial means by which a right or privilege is enforced or the violation of a right or privilege is prevented, redressed, or compensated.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

remedy
n.
   the means to achieve justice in any matter in which legal rights are involved. Remedies may be ordered by the court, granted by judgment after trial or hearing, by agreement (settlement) between the person claiming harm and the person he/she believes has caused it, and by the automatic operation of law. Some remedies require that certain acts be performed or prohibited (originally called "equity"); others involve payment of money to cover loss due to injury or breach of contract; and still others require a court's declaration of the rights of the parties and an order to honor them. An "extraordinary remedy" is a means employed by a judge to meet particular problems, such as appointment of a referee, master or receiver to investigate, report or take charge of property. A "provisional remedy" is a temporary solution to hold matters in status quo pending a final decision or an attempt to see if the remedy will work.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Remedy — may refer to:Music* Remedy (David Crowder Band album), an album by the Christian worship group David Crowder Band * Remedy (album), an album by British house duo Basement Jaxx *Remedy (rapper), an American rapper affiliated with the Wu Tang Clan… …   Wikipedia

  • remedy — rem‧e‧dy [ˈremdi] noun remedies PLURALFORM [countable] a way of dealing with a problem: • The company will vigorously pursue all legal remedies against anyone interfering with its rights. • a structural remedy for poor productivity and quality… …   Financial and business terms

  • remedy — n Remedy, cure, medicine, medicament, medication, specific, physic are comparable when they mean something prescribed or used for the treatment of disease. Remedy applies to a substance or treatment that is known or regarded as effective in… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Remedy — Rem e*dy (r?m ? d?), n.; pl. {Remedies} ( d?z). [L. remedium; pref. re re + mederi to heal, to cure: cf. F. rem[ e]de remedy, rem[ e]dier to remedy. See {Medical}.] [1913 Webster] 1. That which relieves or cures a disease; any medicine or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Remedy — Rem e*dy, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Remedied} ( d?d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Remedying}.] [L. remediare, remediari: cf. F. rem[ e]dier. See {Remedy}, n.] To apply a remedy to; to relieve; to cure; to heal; to repair; to redress; to correct; to counteract.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Remedy — (engl. für „Heilmittel“) bezeichnet den finnischen Computerspiele Entwickler Remedy Entertainment den US amerikanischen Softwareentwickler Remedy Corporation, bis zur Übernahme durch BMC Hersteller des Action Request System den US amerikanischen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Remedy — Rémedy: Remedy (альбом) дебютный альбом группы Basement Jaxx. Remedy Entertainment финский разработчик видеоигр …   Википедия

  • remedy — (n.) early 13c., from Anglo Fr. remedie, O.Fr. remede, from L. remedium a cure, remedy, medicine from re , intensive prefix (or perhaps literally, again ), + mederi to heal (see MEDICAL (Cf. medical)). The verb is attested from early 15c. Related …   Etymology dictionary

  • remedy — [n] cure, solution antidote, assistance, biologic, corrective, counteractant, counteraction, counteractive, counteragent, countermeasure, counterstep, cure all*, drug, elixir, fix, improvement, medicament, medicant, medicine, panacea,… …   New thesaurus

  • remedy — ► NOUN (pl. remedies) 1) a medicine or treatment for a disease or injury. 2) a means of counteracting or eliminating something undesirable. 3) a means of legal reparation. ► VERB (remedies, remedied) ▪ make good (an undesirable situation); re …   English terms dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”