bailiff
bai·liff /'bā-ləf/ n [Anglo-French, steward, king's official, from bail stewardship, custody, handing over see bail]: an officer of some courts in the U.S. whose duties usu. include keeping order in the courtroom and guarding prisoners or jurors in deliberation

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

bailiff
index marshal

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


bailiff
n.
(1) A court officer who keeps order and looks after jurors and prisoners.
(2) An agent or steward who is responsible for property or goods.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


bailiff
1. a person employed by the court to seize property in satisfaction of a court order and to ensure the due service of documents.
2. the Chief Magistrate, President and first citizen of both the bailiwicks – Jersey and Guernsey.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


bailiff
1) A court official, usually a peace officer or deputy sheriff, who keeps order in the courtroom and handles errands for the judge and clerk.
2) In some jurisdictions, a person appointed by the court to handle the affairs of an incompetent person or to be a keeper of goods or money pending further order of the court.
Category: Representing Yourself in Court
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits
Category: Working With a Lawyer

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


bailiff
n.
1 A court officer charged with maintaining order in the courtroom, with taking care of the judge's and jury's needs, and, in criminal proceedings, with the custody of the defendant.
2 A sheriff's deputy or other officer who executes writs and serves processes and warrants of arrest.
3 One who oversees the administration of land, goods, and other property, including the collection of rent, for the owner.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


bailiff
An individual who is entrusted with some authority, care, guardianship, or jurisdiction over designated persons or property. One who acts in a managerial or ministerial capacity or takes care of land, goods, and chattels of another in order to make the best profit for the owner. A minor officer of a court serving primarily as a messenger or usher. A low-level court official or sheriff's deputy whose duty is to preserve and protect orderly conduct in court proceedings.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


bailiff
I
An individual who is entrusted with some authority, care, guardianship, or jurisdiction over designated persons or property. One who acts in a managerial or ministerial capacity or takes care of land, goods, and chattels of another in order to make the best profit for the owner. A minor officer of a court serving primarily as a messenger or usher. A low-level court official or sheriff's deputy whose duty is to preserve and protect orderly conduct in court proceedings.
II An officer of the court responsible for keeping order and maintaining appropriate courtroom decorum and has custody of the jury.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

bailiff
n.
   1) a court official, usually a deputy sheriff, who keeps order in the courtroom and handles various errands for the judge and clerk.
   2) in some jurisdictions, a person appointed by the court to handle the affairs of an incompetent person or to be a "keeper" of goods or money pending further order of the court. "Bailiff" has its origin in Old French and Middle English for custodian, and in the Middle Ages was a significant position in the English court system. The word "bailiwick" originally meant the jurisdictional territory of a bailiff.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bailiff — Bail iff (b[=a]l [i^]f), n. [OF. baillif, F. bailli, custodian, magistrate, fr. L. bajulus porter. See {Bail} to deliver.] [1913 Webster] 1. Originally, a person put in charge of something; especially, a chief officer, magistrate, or keeper, as… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bailiff — bai‧liff [ˈbeɪlɪf] noun [countable] LAW 1. an official of the legal system who has the right to take the goods or property of a person or organization in debt, in order to pay off the debts: • If the fines remain unpaid, bailiffs can enter your… …   Financial and business terms

  • Bailiff — (engl., spr. bēlif), s. Bailli …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Bailiff — (engl., spr. behliff), eigentlich Geschäftsträger; am gebräuchlichsten für den mit der Zwangsvollstreckung gerichtlicher Urteile betrauten Beamten …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • bailiff — A person, appointed under provincial legislation, who will act or assist any other person to repossess, cease or distrain pursuant to conditions set out in various Acts (Ontario Bankruptcy Dictionary) A person who, in British Columbia, is… …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • bailiff — mid 13c., from O.Fr. baillif (12c., nom. baillis) administrative official, deputy, from V.L. *bajulivus official in charge of a castle, from L. bajulus porter, of unknown origin. Used in M.E. of a public administrator of a district, a chief… …   Etymology dictionary

  • bailiff — ► NOUN 1) chiefly Brit. a sheriff s officer who serves writs, seizes property to clear rent arrears, and carries out arrests. 2) Brit. the agent of a landlord. ORIGIN Old French baillif, from Latin bajulus carrier, manager …   English terms dictionary

  • bailiff — [bā′lif] n. [ME bailif < OFr bailif < baillier, to govern, keep in custody: see BAIL1] 1. a deputy sheriff who serves processes, etc. 2. a court officer who guards the jurors, maintains order in the courtroom, etc. 3. in England, an… …   English World dictionary

  • Bailiff — Not to be confused with Baillie. For Farm bailiff, see Estate agent. A bailiff (from Late Latin baiulivus, adjectival form of baiulus) is a governor or custodian (cf. bail); a legal officer to whom some degree of authority, care or jurisdiction… …   Wikipedia

  • bailiff — noun 1 (BrE) law officer who serves writs, seizes property, etc. ADJECTIVE ▪ court ▪ private VERB + BAILIFF ▪ send in ▪ Their landlord has threatened to send in the bailiffs if they don t pay their rent …   Collocations dictionary

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