bench warrant
bench warrant see warrant

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

bench warrant
index search warrant

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


bench warrant
n.
An order issued by a court for the arrest of a person, often used to make that person appear in court.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


bench warrant
An arrest warrant issued by a judge while sitting on the bench, holding court. A bench warrant is used when a defendant on bail fails to show up, or when a witness under subpoena fails to appear. The judge will usually set bail at the same time. Bench warrants for lesser matters (such as failing to appear to answer to a traffic ticket) may simply be noted on the defendant's record. If the defendant is stopped later by the police for any reason, the police will have the ability to act on the warrant and arrest the person.
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


bench warrant
A process that is initiated by the court pro se in order to attach or arrest a person. An order that a judge, or group of judges, issues directly to the police with the purpose of directing a person's arrest.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


bench warrant
I
A process that is initiated by the court pro se in order to attach or arrest a person.
 
An order that a judge, or group of judges, issues directly to the police with the purpose of directing a person's arrest.
II An order issued by a judge for the arrest of a person.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

bench warrant
n.
   a warrant issued by a judge, often to command someone to appear before the judge, with a setting of an amount of bail to be posted. Often a bench warrant is used in lesser matters to encourage the party to appear in court.
   See also: warrant

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bench warrant — Warrant War rant, n. [OE. warant, OF. warant a warrant, a defender, protector, F. garant, originally a p. pr. pf German origin, fr. OHG. wer[=e]n to grant, warrant, G. gew[ a]hren; akin to OFries. wera. Cf. {Guarantee}.] [1913 Webster] 1. That… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bench warrant — Bench war rant (Law) A process issued by a presiding judge or by a court against a person guilty of some contempt, or indicted for some crime; so called in distinction from a justice s warrant. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bench-warrant — benchˈ warrant noun One issued by a judge rather than a justice or magistrate • • • Main Entry: ↑bench …   Useful english dictionary

  • bench warrant — n. an order issued by a judge or law court for the arrest of a person, as one charged with contempt of court or a criminal offense …   English World dictionary

  • bench warrant — n. to issue a bench warrant * * * [ bentʃˌwɒrənt] to issue a bench warrant …   Combinatory dictionary

  • bench warrant — bench′ war rant n. law a warrant issued or ordered by a judge or court for the apprehension of an offender • Etymology: 1690–1700 …   From formal English to slang

  • bench warrant — warrant issued by a court for the apprehension of an offender …   English contemporary dictionary

  • bench warrant — A warrant issued by a judge for the apprehension of a person on a charge of contempt; a warrant for arrest issued by a judge of a court of general jurisdiction for the apprehension of a person who has been indicted for a criminal offense; a… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • bench warrant — /ˈbɛntʃ wɒrənt/ (say bench woruhnt) noun Law a warrant for arrest issued by a court …   Australian English dictionary

  • bench warrant — noun a warrant authorizing law enforcement officials to apprehend an offender and bring that person to court • Syn: ↑arrest warrant • Topics: ↑law, ↑jurisprudence • Hypernyms: ↑warrant • Hyponyms: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

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