weight of evidence
n.
The preponderance of the evidence; the side of the case that has more evidence supporting it.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


weight of evidence
the degree of reliance that a court places on a piece of evidence.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


weight of evidence
The strength, value, and believability of evidence. (See also: preponderance of the evidence)
Category: Accidents & Injuries
Category: Representing Yourself in Court
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


weight of evidence
Measure of credible proof on one side of a dispute as compared with the credible proof on the other, particularly the probative evidence considered by a judge or jury during a trial.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


weight of evidence
Measure of credible proof on one side of a dispute as compared with the credible proof on the other, particularly the probative evidence considered by a judge or jury during a trial.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

weight of evidence
n.
   the strength, value and believability of evidence presented on a factual issue by one side as compared to evidence introduced by the other side.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • weight of evidence — The balance or preponderance of evidence; the inclination of the greater amount of credible evidence, offered in a trial, to support one side of the issue rather than the other. It indicates clearly to the jury that the party having the burden of …   Black's law dictionary

  • weight of evidence — The effect of evidence as proof; the probative force of evidence. 30 Am J2d Ev § 1080 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • weight of evidence — influence of evidence on the decision of a judicial instance …   English contemporary dictionary

  • manifest weight of evidence — The word manifest , in rule that appellate court cannot substitute its opinion for that of trial court as to facts unless trial court s finding is manifestly against the weight of the evidence, means unmistakable, clear, plain, or indisputable,… …   Black's law dictionary

  • manifest weight of evidence — The word manifest , in rule that appellate court cannot substitute its opinion for that of trial court as to facts unless trial court s finding is manifestly against the weight of the evidence, means unmistakable, clear, plain, or indisputable,… …   Black's law dictionary

  • weight of the evidence — n. The relative value of the total evidence presented by one side of a judicial proceeding when compared to the evidence presented by the other. The phrase refers to the persuasiveness of the testimony of witnesses and the physical evidence… …   Law dictionary

  • preponderance of evidence — As standard of proof in civil cases, is evidence which is of greater weight or more convincing than the evidence which is offered in opposition to it; that is, evidence which as a whole shows that the fact sought to be proved is more probable… …   Black's law dictionary

  • preponderance of evidence — The weight, credit, and value of the aggregate evidence on either side; the greater weight of the evidence the greater weight of the credible evidence. In the last analysis, the probability of the truth; evidence more convincing as worthy of… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • preponderance of evidence — A standard of proof that must be met by a plaintiff if he or she is to win a civil action. Dictionary from West s Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005. preponderance of evidence I …   Law dictionary

  • against the weight of the evidence — Contrary to the evidence. Russell v. Pilger, 113 Vt. 537, 37 A.2d 403, 411. A finding is against the manifest weight of the evidence if an opposite conclusion is clearly evident. Burke v. Board of Review, 2 Dist., 132 Ill.App.3d 1094, 87 Ill.Dec …   Black's law dictionary

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