bill of lading
bill of lad·ing /-'lā-diŋ/: a document issued by a carrier that lists goods being shipped and specifies the terms of their transport
◇ A bill of lading serves as a receipt for the goods, a contract for the transport of the goods, and a document of title showing that the person in possession of the bill has title to the goods.
clean bill of lading: a bill of lading that does not have any notations written or otherwise marked on it that qualify or amend the bill
negotiable bill of lading: order bill of lading in this entry
nonnegotiable bill of lading: straight bill of lading in this entry
order bill of lading: a bill of lading under which the goods are to be delivered to the person named in the bill or to the named person's order or to the bearer of the bill – called also negotiable bill of lading; compare straight bill of lading in this entry
straight bill of lading: a bill of lading that names the only person to whom the goods may be delivered – called also nonnegotiable bill of lading; compare order bill of lading in this entry

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

bill of lading
index invoice (itemized list)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


bill of lading
A bill of lading represents the contract between the seller and the shipping company. It also functions as a receipt that the goods were loaded in a certain condition. As a document of title, it is also a way of passing ownership to the consignee named on the bill. In other forms of transport, bills serve a similar function, but unlike the shipping bill of lading, do not act as a document of title.

Easyform Glossary of Law Terms. — UK law terms.


bill of lading
n.
A receipt given by a carrier to someone who entrusts goods to the carrier for shipment, serving as a contract between shipper and carrier and giving its holder title to the goods held by the carrier.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


bill of lading
an instrument that authenticates the transfer of property in goods sent by ship; in form, it is a receipt given by the captain to the shipper or consignor, undertaking to deliver the goods, on payment of the freight, to some person whose name is stated in it or indorsed on it by the consignor. A bill of lading is used both as a contract for carriage and a document of title. It is not, however, a negotiable instrument, and a bona fide purchaser for value obtains no better title to the consigned goods than that enjoyed by the consignor (though it is possible for him to defeat the right of stoppage of an unpaid seller). Nevertheless, it has similarities to a negotiable instrument in that if it is drawn 'to the order' of a person it may be endorsed and transferred by delivery. See the Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1992.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


bill of lading
A document of title for goods being shipped that demonstrates the holder has a right to transport the goods. It also acts as a receipt to the shipper of goods from the carrier (trucking company, railroad, ship, or air freighter) as well as a contract providing the terms of transport.
Category: Personal Finance & Retirement

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

bill of lading
A receipt issued by a carrier to a shipper on shipment of cargo which serves as a document of title to the goods, and may be negotiated by endorsement to third parties.
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Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.


bill of lading
n. A document issued by a carrier or by a shipper's agent that identifies the goods received for shipment, where the goods are to be delivered, and who is entitled to receive the shipment. Abbreviated B/L.
@ clean bill
@ clean bill of lading
clean bill or clean bill of lading. A bill of lading with no added notations that change or qualify its terms.
@ order bill
@ order bill of lading
order bill or order bill of lading. A bill of lading that is negotiable and that states that the goods can be delivered only when the bill of lading is presented to the carrier. Title to the bill of lading and to the goods identified in it can be transferred by the shipper, indorsing and giving up possession of the document to another, who is then entitled to receive the goods from the carrier.
@ straight bill
@ straight bill of lading
straight bill or straight bill of lading. A nonnegotiable bill of lading that merely specifies the specific place and person the carrier is to deliver the goods to.
@ through bill
@ through bill of lading
through bill or through bill of lading. A bill of lading issued by the first of multiple connecting carriers who are going to ship the goods. By issuing the document, the first carrier assumes responsibility for the other carriers for the shipment's eventual arrival and delivery at the designated place and person.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


bill of lading
A document signed by a carrier (a transporter of goods) or the carrier's representative and issued to a consignor (the shipper of goods) that evidences the receipt of goods for shipment to a specified designation and person.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


bill of lading
A document signed by a carrier (a transporter of goods) or the carrier's representative and issued to a consignor (the shipper of goods) that evidences the receipt of goods for shipment to a specified designation and person.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

bill of lading
n.
   a receipt obtained by the shipper of goods from the carrier (trucking company, railroad, ship or air freighter) for shipment to a particular buyer. It is a contract protecting the shipper by guaranteeing payment and satisfies the carrier that the recipient has proof of the right to the goods. The bill of lading is then sent to the buyer by the shipper upon payment for the goods, and is thus proof that the recipient is entitled to the goods when received. Thus, if there is no bill of lading, there is no delivery.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bill of lading — Bill Bill, n. [OE. bill, bille, fr. LL. billa (or OF. bille), for L. bulla anything rounded, LL., seal, stamp, letter, edict, roll; cf. F. bille a ball, prob. fr. Ger.; cf. MHG. bickel, D. bikkel, dice. Cf. {Bull} papal edict, {Billet} a paper.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bill of lading — Lading Lad ing, n. 1. The act of loading. [1913 Webster] 2. That which lades or constitutes a load or cargo; freight; burden; as, the lading of a ship. [1913 Webster] {Bill of lading}. See under {Bill}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bill of lading — plural bills of lading n technical a list of the goods being carried, especially on a ship …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • bill of lading — (plural ,bills of lading) noun count a list of the goods that are being sent somewhere on a ship …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • bill of lading — ► bill of lading a detailed list of a ship s cargo given by the master of the ship to the person consigning the goods. Main Entry: ↑bill …   English terms dictionary

  • bill of lading — A document received by a transportation company acknowledging that it has received certain goods and, for the purpose of transportation, serves as title to that property. (Dictionary of Canadian Bankruptcy Terms) United Glossary of Bankruptcy… …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • bill of lading — n. a document issued to a shipper by a carrier describing the goods to be shipped, acknowledging their receipt, and stating the terms of the contract for their carriage …   English World dictionary

  • Bill of lading — Admiralty law History …   Wikipedia

  • Bill of lading — A contract between the exporter and a transportation company in which the latter agrees to transport the goods under specified conditions which limit its liability. It is the exporter s receipt for the goods as well as proof that goods have been… …   Financial and business terms

  • bill of lading — A contract between an exporter and a transportation company in which the latter agrees to transport the goods under specified conditions that limit its liability. It is the exporter s receipt for the goods as well as proof that goods have been or …   Financial and business terms

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