boycott
boy·cott /'bȯi-ˌkät/ vt: to engage in a concerted refusal to have dealings with (as a store, business, or organization) usu. to express disapproval or to force acceptance of certain conditions see also primary boycott, secondary boycott
◇ A boycott of a business by its competitors, suppliers, or buyers that has the effect of preventing the business's access to the market is a violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act.
boycott n

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

boycott
I noun abstention from buying, abstention from using, avoidance, ban, banning, black-listing, blackballing, debarring, embargo, exclusion, ostracism, proscription, refusal to do business, rejection, shunning, strike, withholding of patronage associated concepts: primary boycott, secondary boycott II index condemn (ban), disapprove (reject), eschew, exclude, exclusion, ignore, picket, proscription, reject, shun, strike, strike (refuse to work)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


boycott
v.
To withdraw from commercial or social dealings with a person, business, or state as a way of showing displeasure with that party’s actions.
n.
boycott

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


boycott
An organized effort to damage a business by refusing to patronize it. The goal is attract attention to and influence the business's policies. Labor unions and their sympathizers have boycotted lettuce and grapes not picked by union farm workers, and civil rights activists have boycotted stores and restaurants that had "white only" hiring policies. The term is named for Captain Charles C. Boycott, a notorious land agent, whose neighbors ostracized him during Ireland's Land League rent wars in the 1880s. Boycotts are not illegal in themselves, unless there are threats or violence involved. (See also: secondary boycott)
Category: Business, LLCs & Corporations
Category: Employment Law & HR

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


boycott
v.
1 A concerted action by two or more individuals or entities to avoid commercial dealings with a business or to induce others to take the same action. This may include the refusal to work for the business and to purchase or distribute the company's products. While peaceful boycotts are generally legal, boycotts that use coercion or intimidation to prevent others from dealing with the targeted business are not.
2 To engage in a boycott.
See also picketing, strike.
=>> boycott.
@ consumer boycott
A concerted refusal of consumers to purchase the products or services of a business to indicate displeasure with the manufacturer, seller, or provider of the product.
=>> boycott.
@ group boycott
A concerted refusal of a group of competing businesses to conduct commercial transactions with a company with whom they would otherwise do business. Such boycotts are illegal under the Sherman Antitrust Act.
=>> boycott.
@ primary boycott
A union-organized boycott of an employer with which the union's membership have a labor dispute. For example, a union involved in a dispute over wages with a business may encourage customers not to buy that company's products.
=>> boycott.
@ secondary boycott
A boycott of a targeted company's customers or suppliers with whom the boycotters have no direct dispute to compel those customers and suppliers to refrain from doing business with the targeted company. Such boycotts are illegal under the Taft-Hartley Act if organized by a union.
=>> boycott.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


boycott
A lawful concerted attempt by a group of people to express displeasure with, or obtain concessions from, a particular person or company by refusing to do business with them. An un- lawful attempt that is prohibited by the Sherman Anti-Trust Act (15 U.S.C.A. § 1 et seq.), to adversely affect a company through threat, coercion, or intimidation of its employees, or to prevent others from doing business with said company. A practice utilized in labor disputes whereby an organized group of employees bands together and refrains from dealing with an employer, the legality of which is determined by applicable provisions of statutes governing labor-management relations.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


boycott
A lawful concerted attempt by a group of people to express displeasure with, or obtain concessions from, a particular person or company by refusing to do business with them. An un lawful attempt that is prohibited by the Sherman Anti-trust Act (15 U.S.C.A. § 1 et seq.), to adversely affect a company through threat, coercion, or intimidation of its employees, or to prevent others from doing business with said company. A practice utilized in labor disputes whereby an organized group of employees bands together and refrains from dealing with an employer, the legality of which is determined by applicable provisions of statutes governing labor-management relations.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

boycott
n.
   organized refusal to purchase products or patronize a store to damage the producer or merchant monetarily, to influence its policy, and/or to attract attention to a social cause. Labor unions and their sympathizers have boycotted lettuce and grapes not picked by union farm workers, and civil rights activists have boycotted stores and restaurants that had "white only" hiring policies. The term is named for Captain Charles C. Boycott, a notorious land agent whose neighbors ostracized him during Ireland's Land League rent wars in the 1880's. Boycotts are not illegal in themselves, unless there are threats of violence involved. A "secondary" boycott, which boycotts those who do business with the primary target of the boycotters, is an unfair labor practice under federal and state laws.
   See also: secondary boycott

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • boycott — [ bɔjkɔt ] n. m. • 1888; mot angl. ♦ Anglic. Boycottage. Le boycott des Jeux olympiques par un pays. Boycott commercial, économique. ⇒ blocus, embargo. Des boycotts. ● boycott ou boycottage nom masculin (mot anglais boycott) Action de boycotter,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Boycott — Boy cott , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Boycotted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Boycotting}.] [From Captain Boycott, a land agent in Mayo, Ireland, so treated in 1880.] To combine against (a landlord, tradesman, employer, or other person), to withhold social or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • boycott — [boi′kät΄] vt. [after Capt. C. C. Boycott, land agent ostracized by his neighbors during the Land League agitation in Ireland in 1880] 1. to join together in refusing to deal with, so as to punish, coerce, etc. 2. to refuse to buy, sell, or use… …   English World dictionary

  • boycott — 1880, noun and verb, from Irish Land League ostracism of Capt. Charles C. Boycott (1832 1897), land agent of Lough Mask in County Mayo, who refused to lower rents for his tenant farmers. Quickly adopted by newspapers in languages as far afield as …   Etymology dictionary

  • boycott — ► VERB ▪ refuse to have commercial or social dealings with (a person, organization, or country) as a punishment or protest. ► NOUN ▪ an act of boycotting. ORIGIN from Captain Charles C. Boycott, an Irish land agent so treated in 1880 in an… …   English terms dictionary

  • Boycott — Boy cott, n. The process, fact, or pressure of boycotting; a combining to withhold or prevent dealing or social intercourse with a tradesman, employer, etc.; social and business interdiction for the purpose of coercion. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Boycott — Boycott, Name eines engl. Kapitäns (gest. im Juni 1897 zu Flexton in Suffolk), der die Güter des Grafen Erne in der irischen Grafschaft Mayo verwaltete und sich durch seine Strenge gegen die Pachter so verhaßt machte, daß das Volk ihn förmlich in …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Boycott — Boycott, s. Boykottieren …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • boycott — → boicot …   Diccionario panhispánico de dudas

  • boycott — [v] ban; refrain from using avoid, bar, blackball*, blacklist, brush off, cut off, embargo, exclude, hold aloof from, ice out*, ostracize, outlaw, pass by*, pass up*, prohibit, proscribe, refuse, reject, shut out*, snub, spurn, strike, withhold… …   New thesaurus

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”