caveat emptor
caveat emp·tor /-'emp-tər, -ˌtȯr/ n [New Latin, may the buyer beware]: a principle in commercial transactions: without a warranty the buyer takes the risk as to the condition of the property or goods compare products liability at liability 2b, warranty

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

caveat emptor
noun at one's own risk, purchase without a guaranty, purchase without a warranty, purchased at one's risk, unassured purchase, uncovenanted purchase, unendorsed purchase, unguaranteed purchase, unwarranted purchase

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


caveat emptor
n.
(Latin) Let the buyer beware; the principle that the buyer is responsible for examining merchandise and judging its quality before buying it.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


caveat emptor
'let the buyer beware', no longer an accurate statement of the law unless very fully qualified. In relation to immoveable or heritable property, it is still a guiding general principle, the terms of the contract between the parties tending to resolve many common problems. In relation to the sale of moveable corporeal property or goods, there are implied terms that in some cases cannot be excluded even by the agreement of the parties and others that may be excluded only if it is fair and reasonable to do so. See quality.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


caveat emptor
Latin for "let the buyer beware." The basic premise is that you are buying a product or property at your own risk and should personally examine and test for obvious defects and imperfections. Caveat emptor still applies even if the purchase is "as is" or when a defect is obvious upon reasonable inspection before purchase. Since implied warranties and consumer protections regarding product liability have come upon the legal landscape, the seller is held to a higher standard of disclosure than "buyer beware" and has responsibility for defects which a buyer cannot note by casual inspection.
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


caveat emptor
n. Latin Let the buyer beware. The legal principle that, unless the quality of a product is guaranteed in a warranty, the buyer purchases the product as it is and cannot hold another liable for any defects. Statutes and court decisions concerning products liability and implied warranties have substantially altered this rule.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


caveat emptor
(Latin: Let the buyer beware.)
A warning that notifies a buyer that the goods he or she is buying are "as is," or subject to all defects.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


caveat emptor
I
[Latin, Let the buyer beware.] A warning that notifies a buyer that the goods he or she is buying are "as is," or subject to all defects.
II Let the buyer beware.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

caveat emptor
[kah-vee-ott emptor]
   Latin for "let the buyer beware." The basic premise that the buyer buys at his/her own risk and therefore should examine and test a product himself/herself for obvious defects and imperfections. Caveat emptor still applies even if the purchase is "as is" or when a defect is obvious upon reasonable inspection before purchase. Since implied warranties (assumed quality of goods) and consumer protections have come upon the legal landscape, the seller is held to a higher standard of disclosure than "buyer beware" and has responsibility for defects which could not be noted by casual inspection (particularly since modern devices cannot be tested except by use and many products are pre-packaged).
   See also: consumer protection laws

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Caveat Emptor — est une expression latine signifiant « que l acheteur soit vigilant ». Dans certaines juridictions, l acheteur n avait aucune garantie sur la qualité des produits. Aujourd hui, les lois de plusieurs pays exigent que le produit respecte… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Caveat emptor — Caveat Ca ve*at, n. [L. caved let him beware, pres. subj. of cavere to be on one s guard to, beware.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Law) A notice given by an interested party to some officer not to do a certain act until the party is heard in opposition; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Caveat emptor — est une expression latine signifiant « que l acheteur soit vigilant ». Dans certaines juridictions, l acheteur n avait aucune garantie sur la qualité des produits. Aujourd hui, les lois de plusieurs pays exigent que le produit respecte… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • caveat emptor — Latin, lit. let the buyer beware; see CAVEAT (Cf. caveat) and EXEMPT (Cf. exempt) (adj.) …   Etymology dictionary

  • Caveat emptor — ist lateinisch für ‚Der Käufer muss Acht geben‘, auch ‚Der Käufer möge sich hüten‘. Vor der gesetzlichen Verankerung der Gewährleistung im modernen Zivilrecht hatte ein Käufer gewöhnlich keinerlei Garantie für die Qualität der Ware, wenn er nicht …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • caveat emptor — Let the buyer beware. (Dictionary of Canadian Bankruptcy Terms) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012 …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • caveat emptor — [emp′tôr΄] [L] let the buyer beware (i.e., one buys at one s own risk) …   English World dictionary

  • Caveat emptor — Buyer Beware redirects here. For the Irish television show, see Buyer Beware!. Caveat emptor (  /ˌkæ …   Wikipedia

  • caveat emptor — let the buyer beware. The condition of sale is that the purchase is at the buyer s risk. Glossary of Business Terms Latin expressions for buyer beware and seller beware, which warn of overly risky, inadequately protected markets. Bloomberg… …   Financial and business terms

  • caveat emptor — /kav ee aht emp tawr, at , kah vee , kay /; Lat. /kah we aht emp tohrdd/. let the buyer beware: the principle that the seller of a product cannot be held responsible for its quality unless it is guaranteed in a warranty. [1515 25; < L] * * * ▪… …   Universalium

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