accrue
ac·crue /ə-'krü/ vb ac·crued, ac·cru·ing [Middle French accreue increase, addition to a property, from feminine of accreu, past participle of acreistre to increase]
vi
1: to come into existence as an enforceable claim: vest as a right
action...does not accrue until the plaintiff knew or reasonably should have known that he may have suffered injuryNational Law Journal
◇ Statutes of limitations begin to run when a cause of action accrues.
2: to come by way of increase or addition: arise as a growth or result
— usu. used with to or from
advantages accruing to society from the freedom of the press
interest accrue s to the seller as a result of the delay
3: to be periodically accumulated in the process of time whether as an increase or a decrease
the accruing of taxes
allowing the receivable interest to accrue
vt
1: to accumulate or have due after a period of time
authorized by law to accrue leave...in the maximum amount of 120 daysU.S. Code
2: to enter in the books as an accrual

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

accrue
I (arise) verb acquire, be derived, become due, become enforceable, become present, come, develop, emanate, ensue, eventuate, fall due, flow, follow, inure, issue, mature, occur, originate, proceed, progress, result from, rise from, spring, yield associated concepts: accrual accounting method, accrual of a cause of action, accrued benefit, accrued claims against a municipal corporation, accrued debt, accrued rights, statute of limitations, tolls foreign phrases:
- Confirmare nemo potest prius quam jus ei acciderit. — No one can confirm a right before the right accrues to him
II (increase) verb accumulate, acquire, add on, advance, aggrandize, amass, amplify, annex, appreciate, augment, become added, become greater, become larger, branch out, broaden, build, build up, collect, enlarge, escalate, expand, extend, further, gain, gather, greaten, grow, heighten, improve, intensify, mount, multiply, raise, redouble, supplement, swell, widen associated concepts: accrual accounting method, accrual of compensation, accrual of taxes, accrued basis, accrued costs, accrued dividend, accrued earnings, accrued income, accrued interest, accrued overtime, accrued taxes III index accumulate (enlarge), arise (originate), bear (yield), compound, develop, hoard, increase, mature, redound, result, yield (produce a return)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


accrue
v.
(1) To accumulate or increase; to receive at regular intervals; to become due.
(2) To come into existence as a cause of action.
n.
accrual

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


accrue
To earn or accumulate over time, such as interest on an investment that grows or vacation time that is earned by working a certain number of hours.
Category: Bankruptcy, Foreclosure & Debt → Debt & Collection Agencies
Category: Employment Law & HR → Employee Rights
Category: Employment Law & HR → Human Resources
Category: Personal Finance & Retirement

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


accrue
v.
1 To come into existence or mature as an enforceable claim or right. For example, a cause of action may be sued upon once it is an enforceable claim. Likewise, the interest on a sum owed accrues on the date the interest becomes due.
2 To accumulate.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


accrue
To increase; to augment; to come to by way of increase; to be added as an increase, profit, or damage. Acquired; falling due; made or executed; matured; occurred; received; vested; was created; was incurred.
To attach itself to, as a subordinate or accessory claim or demand arises out of, and is joined to, its principal.
The term is also used of independent or original demands, meaning to arise, to happen, to come into force or existence; to vest, as in the phrase, "The right of action did not accrue within six years." To become a present right or demand; to come to pass.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


accrue
To increase; to augment; to come to by way of increase; to be added as an increase, profit, or damage. Acquired; falling due; made or executed; matured; occurred; received; vested; was created; was incurred.
 
To attach itself to, as a subordinate or accessory claim or demand arises out of, and is joined to, its principal.
 
The term is also used of independent or original demands, meaning to arise, to happen, to come into force or existence; to vest, as in the phrase, "The right of action did not accrue within six years." To become a present right or demand; to come to pass.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

accrue
v.
   1) growing or adding to, such as interest on a debt or investment which continues to accumulate.
   2) the coming into being of the right to bring a lawsuit. For example, the right to sue on a contract only accrues when the contract is breached (not on mere suspicion that it might be breached) or when the other party repudiates the contract (anticipatory breach).

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • accrue — ac‧crue [əˈkruː] verb [intransitive, transitive] formal ACCOUNTING 1. if an amount of money accrues, or is accrued, it gradually increases over a period of time: • The tax falls due at the end of the month, and interest will accrue from that date …   Financial and business terms

  • Accrue — Ac*crue ([a^]k*kr[udd] ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Accrued}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Accruing}.] [See {Accrue}, n., and cf. {Accresce}, {Accrete}.] 1. To increase; to augment. [1913 Webster] And though power failed, her courage did accrue. Spenser. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • accrue — [ akry ] n. f. • 1246; de accroître 1 ♦ Augmentation de surface par le retrait des eaux. ⇒ accession, accroissement, atterrissement, laisse. 2 ♦ Extension d un bois par rejets naturels. ● accrue nom féminin (de accroître) Maille supplémentaire qu …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • accrue — [ə kro͞o′] vi. accrued, accruing [ME acreuen < OFr acreu, pp. of acroistre, increase < L accrescere: see ACCRETION] 1. to come as a natural growth, advantage, or right (to) 2. to be added periodically as an increase: said esp. of interest… …   English World dictionary

  • Accrue — Ac*crue , n. [F. accr[^u], OF. acre[ u], p. p. of accroitre, OF. acroistre to increase; L. ad + crescere to increase. Cf. {Accretion}, {Crew}. See {Crescent}.] Something that accrues; advantage accruing. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • accrue — (v.) mid 15c., from O.Fr. acreue growth, increase, what has grown, fem. of acreu, pp. of acreistre (Mod.Fr. accroître) to increase, from L. accrescere (see ACCRETION (Cf. accretion)). Related: Accrued; accruing …   Etymology dictionary

  • accrue — [v] increase by addition or growth, often financial accumulate, amass, build up, collect, enlarge, flow, gather, grow, increase; concepts 763,780 Ant. decrease, lose …   New thesaurus

  • accrue — ► VERB (accrues, accrued, accruing) 1) (of a benefit or sum of money) be received in regular or increasing amounts. 2) accumulate or receive (payments or benefits). DERIVATIVES accrual noun. ORIGIN Old French acreistre in …   English terms dictionary

  • accrue — ac|crue [əˈkru:] v [I and T] [Date: 1400 1500; Origin: Probably from Old French acreue increase , from acreistre to increase , from Latin accrescere; ACCRETION] 1.) if advantages accrue to you, you get those advantages over a period of time… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • accrue — [[t]əkru͟ː[/t]] accrues, accruing, accrued 1) V ERG If money or interest accrues, it gradually increases in amount over a period of time. [TECHNICAL] [V ed] I owed ₤5,000 part of this was accrued interest... While they may use a credit card for… …   English dictionary

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