contingent interest
contingent interest see interest 1

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

contingent interest
index claim (right)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


contingent interest
n.
An interest that will only vest if a specific event occurs.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


contingent interest
An interest that a party will receive only if specific conditions occur. For example, Bill leaves his "interest in The Centerville Cafe to Sarah, if she is still living in Centerville." If Sarah is not living in Centerville when Bill dies, she will not receive his interest in the cafe.
Category: Wills, Trusts & Estates

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

contingent interest
England, Wales
A beneficiary has a contingent interest in a gift (whether in a lifetime trust or in a will), if they have to do something (or something has to occur) before they can get their gift.
For example, a father dies and in his will leaves his estate to his son outright, provided the son attains the age of 21. The son has a contingent interest in his father's estate. On his 21st birthday he gets the estate outright, but if he dies before his 21st birthday he gets nothing.

Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.


contingent interest

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.

contingent interest
n.
   an interest in real property which, according to the deed (or a will or trust), a party will receive only if a certain event occurs or certain circumstances happen. Examples: surviving a person who had a life estate (the right to use the property for his/her life), or having children at the time such a life estate ends.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Contingent interest — A contingent interest is an interest which is uncertain, either as to the person who will enjoy it in possession or as to the event on which it will arise. 57 Am J1st Wills § 1217. A future interest is contingent where the person to whom or the… …   Wikipedia

  • contingent interest — An interest which is uncertain either as to the person who will enjoy it in possession or as to the event on which it will arise. 57 Am J1st Wills § 1217. A future interest is contingent where the person to whom or the event upon which it is… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • contingent interest — See vested interest …   Big dictionary of business and management

  • contingent interest in personal property — A future interest not transmissible to the representatives of the party entitled thereto, in case he dies before it vests in possession. Thus, if a testator leaves the income of a fund to his wife for life, and the capital of the fund to be… …   Black's law dictionary

  • contingent interest in personal property — A future interest not transmissible to the representatives of the party entitled thereto, in case he dies before it vests in possession. Thus, if a testator leaves the income of a fund to his wife for life, and the capital of the fund to be… …   Black's law dictionary

  • interest — in·ter·est / in trəst; in tə rəst, ˌrest/ n [probably alteration of earlier interesse, from Anglo French, from Medieval Latin, from Latin, to be between, make a difference, concern, from inter between, among + esse to be] 1: a right, title, claim …   Law dictionary

  • contingent — con·tin·gent /kən tin jənt/ adj 1: likely but not certain to happen compare executory 2: intended for use in circumstances not completely foreseen a contingent fund 3: dependent on or conditioned by something else …   Law dictionary

  • contingent remainder — see remainder Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. contingent remainder …   Law dictionary

  • contingent beneficiary — see beneficiary a, b Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. contingent beneficiary n. Someone who w …   Law dictionary

  • interest — The most general term that can be employed to denote a right, claim, title, or legal share in something. In its application to real estate or things real, it is frequently used in connection with the terms estate, right, and title. More… …   Black's law dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”