court
court /'kōrt/ n [Old French, enclosed space, royal entourage, court of justice, from Latin cohort - cohors farmyard, armed force, retinue]
1 a: an official assembly for the administration of justice: a unit of the judicial branch of government
the judicial power of the United States shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior court s as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establishU.S. Constitution art. III see also the judicial system in the back matter
b: a session of such a court
c usu cap: the Supreme Court of the United States
2: a place (as a building, hall, or room) for the administration of justice
order in the court
3: a judge or judges acting in official capacity
an issue to be decided by the court
the court may neither preside at nor attend the meeting of creditors — J. H. Williamson
4 usu cap: a legislative body
the General Court of Massachusetts
5: a body (as the International Court of Justice) exercising judicial powers over its members or the members of a body represented by it
an ecclesiastical court
out of court: without a court hearing: by private arrangement
settled out of court

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

court
I noun bar, bar of justice, basilica, bench, forum for adjusting disputes, forum of justice, iudicium, judgment seat, judicial assembly, judicial forum, judicial tribunal, justice, justice seat, lawcourt, magistrates, place where justice is administered, tribunal associated concepts: adjournment of the court, appearance in court, application addressed to the court, civil court, clerk of court, competent court, contempt of court, county court, court-appointed receiver, court below, court calendar, court costs, court in banc, court martial, court of appeals, court of bankruptcy, court of chancery, court of claims, court of common pleas, court of competent jurisdiction, court of first instance, court of general jurisdiction, court of inquest, court of justice, court of last resort, court of limited jurisdiction, court of probate, court of record, court's own motion, court's own witness, criminal court, district court, family court, federal court, fraud upon the court, inferior courts, inherent right of court, jurisdiction of a court, leave of court, legislative courts, local court, municipal courts, opinion of the court, order of the court, power of the court, probate court, proceedings in court, state court, Supreme Court, tax court, term of court, United States courts foreign phrases:
- Actus curiae neminem gravabit. — An act of the court shall prejudice no man
- Cursus curiae est lex curiae. — The practice of the court is the law of the court.
- Ea quae in curia nostra rite acta sunt debitae executioni demandari debent. — Those things which are properly transacted in our court ought to be committed to a due execution
- Nihil habet forum ex scena. — The court has nothing to do with what is not before it
- Nulla curia quae recordum non habet potest imponere finem neque aliquem mandare careeri; quia ista spectant tantummodo ad curias de recordo. — No court which has not a record can impose a fine or commit any person to prison, because those powers belong only to courts of record
II index bench, board, chamber (body), chamber (compartment), close (enclosed area), courtroom, curtilage, homage, judicatory, judicature, lure, pursue (strive to gain), tribunal

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


court
n.
A tribunal in which a judge and/or jury hears and decides civil and/or criminal cases; the governmental entity that applies the state’s laws to cases and controversies and administers justice; also called a court of law.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


court
Any official tribunal presided over by a judge or judges in which legal issues and claims are heard and determined. In the United States, there are essentially two systems: federal courts and state courts. The basic federal court system has jurisdiction over cases involving federal statutes, constitutional questions, actions between citizens of different states, and certain other types of cases. There are also special federal courts such as bankruptcy and tax courts. Each state has local trial courts, which include courts for misdemeanors, smaller demand civil actions (called municipal, city, justice, or some other designation), and then superior or district courts to hear felonies, estates, divorces, and major lawsuits. Some states have speciality courts such as family, surrogate, and domestic relations. Small claims courts are an adjunct of the lowest courts handling lesser disputes.
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


court
n.
1 A governmental body that adjudicates legal disputes by interpreting and applying the law to specific cases.
See also trial.
2 The regular session of a court.
3 The judge or judges who sit on a court.
4 The building or other locale where a judge or judges adjudicate legal disputes.
@ appellate court
A court with jurisdiction to hear appeals from trial courts, administrative agencies, and, when there is an intermediate appellate court, lower appellate courts.
See also trial court
=>> court.
@ Article I court
A quasi-administrative, quasi-judicial federal court created by Congress under Article I of the United States Constitution to settle disputes arising from the implementation of a statutory scheme that Congress has established in the exercise of its legislative power. For example, pursuant to its power to impose and collect taxes under the United States Constitution, Congress has established the United States Tax Court to hear appeals from taxpayers who are unsatisfied with the decisions of the Internal Revenue Service. See also legislative court and Article III court
=>> court.
@ Article III court
A federal court that is part of the judicial branch of the United States government and derives its jurisdiction from Article III of the United States Constitution. See also constitutional court and Article I court
=>> court.
@ circuit court
1 In a state with a judicial system that is divided into geographical units known as circuits for the purpose of holding trials, a trial court that sits in the circuit over which its geographical jurisdiction extends. Often, the jurisdiction of such courts is limited to more serious matters (for example, felonies as opposed to misdemeanors). If the circuit encompasses more than one county, the court may hold sessions in each county.
2 In a state with a judicial system that is divided into geographical units known as circuits for the consideration of appeals on the intermediate level, an intermediate appellate court that hears appeals from the circuit over which its geographical jurisdiction extends.
3 A court of the United States Court of Appeals that considers appeals of the trials conducted in those United States District Courts located within the states contained in the court's circuit. (The United States, for the purposes of the Court of Appeals, is divided into twelve circuits. There is also the special nationwide Federal Circuit, which hears appeals from federal courts and administrative agencies other than the District Court.)
=>> court.
@ civil court
A court that hears the trials of noncriminal cases.
=>> court.
@ constitutional court
A court named or described in a state constitution or the United States Constitution that exercises the judicial power of a state or the federal government. See also Article III court and legislative court
=>> court.
@ county court
A state court with jurisdiction that encompasses a single county and with powers that are determined by a state statute or constitution. In some states, a county court is an administrative, rather than a judicial, governmental body or is a mixture of both.
=>> court.
@ court above
An appellate court to which a case may be appealed.
=>> court.
@ court below
A trial or intermediate appellate court from which a case is appealed.
=>> court.
@ court en banc
Same as full court.
=>> court.
@ court of appeals
1 Usually a state intermediate appellate court.
2 In Maryland and New York, the highest appellate court in those states.
=>> court.
@ court of assize and nisi prius
=>> nisi prius court
@ court of chancery
=>> chanceryor chancery court.
=>> court.
@ court of civil appeals
In some states, an intermediate court of appeal.
@ court of claims
@ court of common pleas
1 In some states, a trial court of general jurisdiction.
2 In some states, an intermediate appellate court.
@ court of criminal appeals
In some states, the court of last resort for criminal actions.
@ court of equity
A trial court that adjudicates legal disputes primarily by applying the rules and principles of equity. Courts of equity have been merged with courts of law in most states.
See also court of law
@ court of first instance
=>> court.
@ court of general jurisdiction
A trial court with unlimited or nearly unlimited jurisdiction to hear any kind of action.
=>> court.
See also court of limited jurisdiction
@ court of last resort
The court from which a particular case can be appealed no further. Usually a state's highest appellate court or the United States Supreme Court.
See also intermediate appellate court
=>> court.
@ court of law
1 A trial court that adjudicates legal disputes primarily by applying statutes and the rules and principles of the common law.
2 In states where courts of equity and courts of law have been merged, any trial court that adjudicates legal disputes.
@ court of limited jurisdiction
A court with jurisdiction to adjudicate only specific kinds of legal disputes (based on either the subject matter of the action or the amount of damages sought).
See also court of general jurisdiction
=>> court.
@ Court of Military Appeal
An appellate court that may review decision of the Court of Military Review. For those appeals that this court declines to consider, this is the court of last resort. However, cases that are considered may be appealed to the United States Supreme Court. This court's decisions are also subject to review by the president of the United States.
@ Court of Military Review
An intermediate appellate court that reviews court-martial decisions.
@ court of original jurisdiction
A court in which, by statute or constitutional provision, a particular type of action must be initiated and where the evidence is heard, the facts determined, and the law applied to those facts for the first time. Also called court of first instance and trial court.
@ court of record
A court that is required to keep a permanent record of all conversations and statements made and non-verbal evidence produced during its proceedings by use of a stenographer or other means.
@ district court
In a state whose judicial system is divided into geographical units known as districts for the purpose of holding trials, a trial court that sits in the district over which its geographical jurisdiction extends. Often, the court's jurisdiction is limited to one county and to less serious matters (for example, misdemeanors as opposed to felonies).
A court in the state or federal system, typically the lowest level trial court serving a particular geographical area.
See also district
See also circuit court
@ drug court
A state court with jurisdiction to adjudicate lesser offenses arising from drug use, usually with an emphasis on medical treatment and supervision rather than punishment for the drug user.
@ ecclesiastical court
A nongovernmental court that is part of the structure of an organized religion and adjudicates internal church issues according to church law. For centuries, such courts also had jurisdiction over matters like divorce and wills that are now within the jurisdiction of the civil courts.
@ en banc court
=>> full court.
=>> court.
@ family court
A state court with jurisdiction to adjudicate family law issues, such as divorce, child custody and visitation, child and spousal support, paternity, and domestic violence.
=>> court.
@ federal court
An Article III court. Most actions involving federal law are tried before one of the United States District Courts. An appeal of a District Court's decision would normally be heard first by one of the United States Court of Appeals, and then by the United States Supreme Court (the court of last resort in the federal judiciary). The Supreme Court also considers appeals of state court decisions involving questions of federal law. There are also a few specialized federal courts; See also United States Court of Federal Claims.
=>> court.
@ full court
In appellate litigation, a session of an appellate court where all the judges participate, typically resulting from a motion to reconsider the decision of a three judge panel. Also known as "en banc" hearing.
@ inferior court
A court whose decision may be appealed to another court within the same judicial system, especially a court of limited, special, or statutory jurisdiction, such as a family or probate court.
=>> court.
@ intermediate appellate court
In those jurisdictions whose appellate court system is divided into two levels, the lowest appellate court, the decisions of which are subject to review by the jurisdiction's highest appellate court.
=>> court.
@ International Court of Justice
The principal judicial body of the United Nations whose fifteen judges usually meet at The Hague, Netherlands, to provide advisory legal opinions to the United Nations and to adjudicate legal disputes between countries who voluntarily submit cases for the court's consideration. Abbreviated ICJ.
n. A tribunal established by the United Nations to hear cases submitted by the consent of United Nations members.
=>> court.
@ International Criminal Court
A permanent international court, tentatively established by the United Nations in 1998, to investigate and adjudicate the most serious violations of international law, such as genocide and war crimes, by applying, until the adoption of an international criminal code, the general principles of international criminal law. Abbreviated ICC.
=>> court.
@ justice court
A state court, presided over by a justice of the peace, that has jurisdiction over certain minor civil and criminal actions that arise outside the city limits of any municipality.
=>> court.
@ juvenile court
A state court with jurisdiction over cases involving children under eighteen years of age or another age set by the state legislature, especially one concerning cases where the child is alleged to have committed what would be an offense if done by an adult.
@ kangaroo court
1 A court that has no legal authority, is often self-appointed or established by criminals or vigilantes, and where few or none of the authorized and regular judicial procedures are usually followed.
2 A lawful court whose procedures are so unauthorized or irregular that its proceedings are extremely improper or unfair.
3 A lawful court that followed authorized and regular procedures, but is so biased against a party as to render its judgment or verdict unfair.
Pejorative. Of an unfair court, in which justice cannot be obtained.
=>> court.
@ legislative court
A court created by a state legislature or the Congress to settle disputes arising from the implementation of a statutory scheme that the legislature or Congress has established in the exercise of their legislative powers, as opposed to a court authorized by a state constitution or the United States Constitution as part of the government's judicial branch. See also Article I court and constitutional court
=>> court.
@ magistrate's court
A state court presided over by a magistrate with jurisdiction over minor offenses and civil actions.
@ military court
A court-martial, military commission, the Court of Military Review, and the Court of Military Justice. These are not Article III courts, but courts established by Congress as a part of its power to raise and maintain a military force under the militia clause found in Article I of the United States Constitution.
=>> court.
@ moot court
A fictitious court consisting of law professors or lawyers, before which law students and other lawyers argue moot or hypothetical cases or cases pending before a court to learn or practice oral advocacy skills and trial techniques.
n. A law-school competition in which students argue imaginary cases before professors sitting as judges.
@ municipal court
A city court with exclusive jurisdiction over violations of city ordinances and sometimes jurisdiction over certain minor civil and criminal cases that arise within the city limits.
See also justice court
=>> court.
@ nisi prius court
Same as court of assize and nisi prius.
=>> nisi prius court.
=>> court.
@ open court
1 A court that, when in session, the public is allowed to attend so long as they are orderly and peaceful.
2 A court that, when in session, is attended by all the parties and their lawyers.
See also ex parte, in camera.
A functioning court attended by all interested parties and admitting the public, presided over by a judge. The term usually implies that all of the business of the court is done in a public judicial proceeding, rather than in a judge's office or chamber(s).
=>> court.
@ out of court
Accomplished or conducted without litigation, without the involvement of a court, or outside a courtroom.
@ probate court
A state court with jurisdiction over proceedings regarding the validity of wills, the administration and disposition of estates, and, in some states, the adoption of minors and the care, custody, guardianship, and protection of minors, incompetent individuals, and their assets. Also called surrogate court.
@ small claims court
A state or municipal court that has the jurisdiction to adjudicate civil actions involving very small sums of money while using informal courtroom procedures without, usually, the presence or participation of lawyers.
=>> court.
@ superior court
1 In some states, a trial court of general jurisdiction.
2 In some states, an intermediate appellate court.
=>> court.
@ supreme court
1 In most states, the court of last resort.
2 In New York, a court of general jurisdiction with trial and appellate divisions.
=>> court.
@ Supreme Court of the United States
The court of last resort in the federal judiciary pursuant to Article III of the United States Constitution, with original jurisdiction in all cases involving ambassadors and other public ministers and consuls as well as in all cases in which a state is a party. The court also has appellate jurisdiction over all cases in federal court as well as those cases in state court involving questions of federal law. Unless it is otherwise clear, the phrase "Supreme Court" always means this court.
=>> court.
@ surrogate court
@ tax court
A state court that adjudicates disputes between the taxpayer and the state's tax collection agency over the individual's tax liabilities.
n.
1 The United States tax court.
2 A court in some states that hears appeals in non-federal cases and that has the power to modify assessments, valuations, tax classification, or appeals.
@ Tax Court
An Article I court that adjudicates disputes between the taxpayer and the Internal Revenue Service over the individual's tax deficiencies. (Disputes over the taxpayer's claim for a refund are considered by the United States Court of Federal Claims.)
n.
1 The United States tax court.
2 A court in some states that hears appeals in non-federal cases and that has the power to modify assessments, valuations, tax classification, or appeals.
@ term of court
A session of court, defined by the court's schedule; may refer to a single session or a schedule of sessions over a period of time.
@ trial court
=>> court.
@ United States Court of Appeals
The intermediate appellate court in the federal judiciary that hears appeals from trials conducted by the United States District Courts and other lower federal courts and appeals of administrative decisions from some federal agencies.
See also circuit court
@ United States Court of Federal Claims
An Article I court with jurisdiction to hear all claims against the United States government that are based on the United States Constitution, a federal statute or regulation, a contract with the federal government, or other cause of action not involving a tort. Formerly called the United States Claims Court.
@ United States District Court
A federal trial court having original jurisdiction for most criminal offenses against the United States and for most of the civil matters described in the United States Constitution.
@ United States Supreme Court
=>> Supreme Court of the United States.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


court
A judicial tribunal established to administer justice. An entity in the government to which the administration of justice is delegated. In a broader sense, the term may also refer to a legislative assembly; a deliberative body, such as the General Court of Massachusetts, which is its legislature.
The words court, judge, or judges, when used in laws, are often synonymous. A kangaroo court is a mock legal proceeding that disregards law and justice by issuing a biased, predetermined judgment regardless of the evidence presented before it.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


court
I
A judicial tribunal established to administer justice. An entity in the government to which the administration of justice is delegated. In a broader sense, the term may also refer to a legislative assembly; a deliberative body, such as the General Court of Massachusetts, which is its legislature.
 
The words court, judge, or judges, when used in laws, are often synonymous. A kangaroo court is a mock legal proceeding that disregards law and justice by issuing a biased, predetermined judgment regardless of the evidence presented before it.
II A body in government to which the administration of justice is delegated.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

court
n.
   1) the judge, as in "The court rules in favor of the plaintiff."
   2) any official tribunal (court) presided over by a judge or judges in which legal issues and claims are heard and determined. In the United States there are essentially two systems: federal courts and state courts. The basic federal court system has jurisdiction over cases involving federal statutes, constitutional questions, actions between citizens of different states, and certain other types of cases. Its trial courts are District Courts in one or more districts per state, over which there are District Courts of Appeal (usually three-judge panels) to hear appeals from judgments of the District Courts within the "circuit." There are 10 geographic circuits throughout the nation. Appeals on constitutional questions and other significant cases are heard by the Supreme Court, but only if that court agrees to hear the case. There are also special federal courts such as bankruptcy and tax courts with appeals directed to the District Courts. Each state has local trial courts, which include courts for misdemeanors (non-penitentiary crimes), smaller demand civil actions (called municipal, city, justice or some other designation), and then courts, usually set up in each county (variously called Superior, District, County, Common Pleas courts and called Supreme Court in New York) to hear felonies (crimes punished by state prison terms), estates, divorces and major lawsuits. The highest state court is called the State Supreme Court, except in New York and Maryland, which call them Court of Appeals. Some 29 states have intermediate appeals courts which hear appeals from trial courts which will result in final decisions unless the State Supreme Court chooses to consider the matter. Some states have speciality courts such as family, surrogate and domestic relations. Small claims courts are an adjunct of the lowest courts handling lesser disputes (although California's limit is $5,000) with no representation by attorneys and short and somewhat informal trials conducted by judges, commissioners or lawyers. The great number of law cases and lawyers' procedural maneuvers has clogged courts' calendars and has induced many states or local courts to set up mediation, arbitration, mandatory settlement conferences and other formats to encourage settlement or early judgments without the cost and wait of full court trials.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • court — court, courte (kour, kour t ; usage variable pour la liaison du t ; les uns disent : un kour espace de temps ; les autres : un kour t espace de temps ; au pluriel, même incertitude pour l s ; quelques uns disant : les kour espaces de temps ; plus …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • court — COURT, COURTE. adj. Qui a peu de longueur. Il est opposé à Long. Trop court. Bien court. Fort court. Un peu court. Extrêmement court. Cheveux courts. Queue courte. Cerises à courte queue. Cheval à courte queue. Il a le cou fort court, le cou… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • Court — (k[=o]rt), n. [OF. court, curt, cort, F. cour, LL. cortis, fr. L. cohors, cors, chors, gen. cohortis, cortis, chortis, an inclosure, court, thing inclosed, crowd, throng; co + a root akin to Gr. chorto s inclosure, feeding place, and to E. garden …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Court — 〈[kɔ:t] m. 6; Sp.; Tennis〉 Spielfeld (bei Tennisturnieren); →a. Centrecourt [engl.] * * * Court [kɔ:t ], der; s, s [engl. court, eigtl. = Hof < afrz. court, ↑ Cour] (Tennis) …   Universal-Lexikon

  • court — [kôrt] n. [OFr < VL curtis < L cohors (gen. cohortis), enclosed place: see COHORT] 1. a) an uncovered space wholly or partly surrounded by buildings or walls; courtyard b) a special section or area of a building, as a museum, somewhat like… …   English World dictionary

  • Court — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Court Escudo …   Wikipedia Español

  • court — [n1] yard, garden of building cloister, close, compass, courtyard, curtilage, enclosure, forum, patio, piazza, plaza, quad, quadrangle, square, street; concepts 509,513 court [n2] ruler’s attendants castle, cortege, entourage, hall, lords and… …   New thesaurus

  • Court — bezeichnet als englischer Begriff den „Hof“ allgemein sowie den „Gerichtshof“ im Besonderen, siehe Gericht den Spielplatz für Ballsportarten wie Tennis und Squash, siehe Court (Sport) den Namen einer Gemeinde im Amtsbezirk Moutier, Kanton Bern,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • court — court; court·li·ness; court·ling; court·man; court·ship; cross·court; court·ly; Court; …   English syllables

  • court — ► NOUN 1) (also court of law) a body of people before whom judicial cases are heard. 2) the place where such a body meets. 3) a quadrangular area marked out for ball games such as tennis. 4) a quadrangle surrounded by a building or group of… …   English terms dictionary

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