wager of law


wager of law
an ancient mode of proof that became unpopular because the defendant could call people as witnesses just to testify to his general oath-worthiness, even if they knew nothing of the facts of the case. It may have accounted for the ascendancy of trover over detinue. Wager of law was well recognised in Scotland. Professor Walker indicates that, although unknown to the Romans, it was 'probably indigenous in Scotland and anterior to the Norman importation of the duel'.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


wager of law
A procedure for defending oneself that could be used in a trial before one of the ancient courts of England.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


wager of law
A procedure for defending oneself that could be used in a trial before one of the ancient courts of England.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wager of law — wager wa ger (w[=a] j[ e]r), n. [OE. wager, wajour, OF. wagiere, or wageure, F. gageure. See {Wage}, v. t.] [1913 Webster] 1. Something deposited, laid, or hazarded on the event of a contest or an unsettled question; a bet; a stake; a pledge.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wager of law — Law Law (l[add]), n. [OE. lawe, laghe, AS. lagu, from the root of E. lie: akin to OS. lag, Icel. l[ o]g, Sw. lag, Dan. lov; cf. L. lex, E. legal. A law is that which is laid, set, or fixed; like statute, fr. L. statuere to make to stand. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wager of law — Compurgation Com pur*ga tion, n. [L. compurgatio, fr. compurgare to purify wholly; com + purgare to make pure. See Purge, v. t.] 1. (Law) The act or practice of justifying or confirming a man s veracity by the oath of others; called also {wager… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wager of law — Etymology: translation of Medieval Latin vadiatio legis : the act of a party having the negative in an action in early English law in giving a pledge or in binding himself to resort to and abide the event of an attempt to prove his case by the… …   Useful english dictionary

  • wager of law — See trial by wager of law …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Wager of Law — ♦ To wage one s law was to defend an accusation in court by swearing a formal oath of innocence supported by oaths of compurgators, i.e., oath helpers. (Warren, W.L. Henry II, 636) …   Medieval glossary

  • wager of law — In old English practice, the giving of gage or sureties by a defendant in an action of debt that at a certain day assigned he would make his law; that is, would take an oath in open court that he did not owe the debt, and at the same time bring… …   Black's law dictionary

  • wager of law — noun historical a form of trial in which the defendant was required to produce witnesses who would swear to his or her innocence …   English new terms dictionary

  • wager of law of non-summons — In common law pleading, the mode in which a tenant or defendant in a real action pleaded, when the summons which followed the original was not served within the proper time …   Black's law dictionary

  • wager of law of non-summons — In common law pleading, the mode in which a tenant or defendant in a real action pleaded, when the summons which followed the original was not served within the proper time …   Black's law dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.