additur


additur
ad·di·tur /'a-di-tər, 'ä-di-ˌtu̇r/ n [Latin, it is increased]: the increase by a court of the jury's award of damages which the court deems insufficient compare remittitur
◇ The Supreme Court held in Dimick v. Schiedt, 293 U.S. 474 (1935) that additur violates the Seventh Amendment and so is not permissible in federal courts. Many state courts allow additur, however, when the defendant agrees to the increased award on the condition that the court deny plaintiff's motion for a new trial.

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

additur
noun assessment of damages, increase of damages, increase of jury award

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


additur
n.
(Latin) A trial court’s increase in the amount of damages awarded to a plaintiff by a jury; this can be done with the defendant’s consent if the court rules that the jury’s award is inadequate, and on the condition that the plaintiff’s motion for a new trial will be denied.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


additur
n. Latin It is added to. A trial court's order to increase the damages awarded by a jury. It is done to prevent the plaintiff from appealing on the grounds that inadequate damages were awarded, but the court cannot issue the order without the defendant's consent.
The term may also refer to the increase itself, the procedure by which it is done, and the court's power to issue the order.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


additur
The power of the trial court to assess damages or increase the amount of an inadequate award made by jury verdict, as a condition of a denial of a motion for a new trial, with the consent of the defendant whether or not the plaintiff consents to such action. This is not allowed in the federal system.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


additur
I
The power of the trial court to assess damages or increase the amount of an inadequate award made by jury verdict, as a condition of a denial of a motion for a new trial, with the consent of the defendant whether or not the plaintiff consents to such action. This is not allowed in the federal system.
II An increase by a judge in the amount of damages awarded by a jury.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Additur — An additur is the legal term referring to the practice of a trial judge adding damages additional to the original amount awarded by the jury. It is not allowed in U.S. Federal Law as established by Dimick v. Schiedt. 293 U.S. 474 (U.S. 1935).… …   Wikipedia

  • additur — noun The augmentation by a judge of damages awarded by a jury …   Wiktionary

  • additur — /abdatar/ The power of trial court to assess damages or increase amount of an inadequate award made by jury verdict, as condition of denial of motion for new trial, with consent of defendant whether or not plaintiff consents to such action.… …   Black's law dictionary

  • additur — /abdatar/ The power of trial court to assess damages or increase amount of an inadequate award made by jury verdict, as condition of denial of motion for new trial, with consent of defendant whether or not plaintiff consents to such action.… …   Black's law dictionary

  • additur — An increase by the court in the amount of damages awarded by the jury. 22 Am J2d Damg §§ 398 et seq …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • quicquid demonstrate rei additur satis demonstrate frustra est — /kwikwid demanstreytiy riyay abdatar saetas demanstrseytiy frastra est/ Whatever is added to demonstrate anything already sufficiently demonstrated is surplusage …   Black's law dictionary

  • quod demonstrandi causa additur rei satis, demonstrate, frustra fit — /kwod demanstraenday koza aedatar riyay seytas, demanstreytiy, frastra fit/ What is added to a thing sufficiently palpable, for the purpose of demonstration, is vain …   Black's law dictionary

  • Quod demonstrandi causa additur rei satis demonstratae, frustra fit — That which is added to anything by way of description, which is already sufficiently described, is superfluous …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • remittitur — re·mit·ti·tur /ri mi tə tər/ n [Latin, it is sent back, remitted, third person singular present indicative passive of remittere to send back, remit] 1 a: a procedure under which a court may order the reduction of an excessive verdict; esp: a… …   Law dictionary

  • ALLELUJAH — Hebr. vox. i. e. Laudate Deum. Augustin. de Divers. Serm. I. c. 1. Nostis, quia Alleluia Latine dicitur, Laudate Deum. Arnobius Iun. in Psalm. 104. Alleluia in isto Psalmo principium sumpsit, quam qui interpretantur, Gloria Deo, Creatori omnium;… …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale