civil disobedience


civil disobedience
civil dis·obe·di·ence n: refusal to obey governmental demands or commands esp. as a nonviolent and usu. collective means of forcing concessions from the government

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

civil disobedience
n.
Deliberately refusing to obey a law as a way of protesting its unfairness.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


civil disobedience
n. The deliberate, public, and usually nonviolent breaking of a law in order to call attention to the unfairness or undesirability of a statute (usually the one that is broken) or some governmental policy, and to influence public opinion concerning the same.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


civil disobedience
A symbolic, non-violent violation of the law, done deliberately in protest against some form of perceived injustice. Mere dissent, protest, or disobedience of the law does not qualify. The act must be nonviolent, open and visible, illegal, performed for the moral purpose of protesting an injustice, and done with the expectation of being punished.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


civil disobedience
A symbolic, non-violent violation of the law, done deliberately in protest against some form of perceived injustice. Mere dissent, protest, or disobedience of the law does not qualify. The act must be nonviolent, open and visible, illegal, performed for the moral purpose of protesting an injustice, and done with the expectation of being punished.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.