degree


degree
de·gree n
1: a step in a direct line of descent or in the line of ascent to a common ancestor
2 a: a measure of the seriousness of a crime see also fifth degree, first degree, fourth degree, second degree, third degree
◇ Crimes are rated by degrees for the purpose of imposing more severe punishments for more serious crimes.
b: a measure of care; also: a measure of negligence esp. in connection with bailments see also care, negligence

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

degree
I (academic title) noun academic honor, award, certificate, collegiate distinction, credentials, credit, dignification, diploma, distinction, graduation certificate, qualification, title, title of honor II (kinship) noun affiliation, blood relation, blood relationship, cognation, connation, connection, consanguinity, extraction, family connection, family relationship, family tie, filiation, line of descent, proximity of blood, relatedness, relationship between persons, ties of blood associated concepts: degree of descent, degree of kindred III (magnitude) noun amount, amplitude, caliber, consequence, dimension, enormity, expanse, extent, greatness, import, importance, intensity, largeness, measure, measurement, might, moment, proportions, range, reach, scope, seriousness, significance, strength, tenor, value, vastness, volume, weight associated concepts: degree of care, degree of certainty, degree of crime, degree of disability, degree of offense, degree of proof, degrees of criminality, highest degree of care, lesser included offenses foreign phrases:
- Quae sunt minoris culpae sunt majoris infamiae. — Those things which are less culpable may be more infamous
IV (station) noun classification, echelon, gradation, grade, gradus, level of development, manner, mark, ordo, plane, point, position, rank, ranking, relative position, rung, situation, stage, stage of advancement, standing, status, step, tier V index caliber (measurement), extent, magnitude, nuance, prestige, step, utmost

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


degree
n.
(1) The amount, level, or extent of something.
(2) A certificate awarded to those who finish a course of study at a university or college.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


degree
n.
1 A step or level in the accomplishment of an act or a duty, or in the determination of a relationship. The level of an offense, such as murder and determining the appropriate punishment for it.
@ degree of care
The standard to which a party is responsible for exercising a duty or responsibility in order to avoid an implication of negligence.
+degree of care
The level of care to be exercised in a particular situation.
@
2.
In trusts and estates or family law matters, degree pertains to genetic proximity (the degree of consanguinity).

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


degree
Extent, measure, or scope of an action, condition, or relation. Legal extent of guilt or negligence.
Title conferred on graduates of school, college, or university. The state or civil condition of a person. The grade or distance one thing may be removed from another; i.e., the distance, or number of removes that separate two persons who are related by consanguinity. Thus, a sibling is in the second degree of kinship but a parent is in the first degree of kinship.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


degree
Extent, measure, or scope of an action, condition, or relation. Legal extent of guilt or negligence.
 
Title conferred on graduates of school, college, or university. The state or civil condition of a person. The grade or distance one thing may be removed from another; i.e., the distance, or number of removes that separate two persons who are related by consanguinity. Thus, a sibling is in the second degree of kinship but a parent is in the first degree of kinship.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Degree — may refer to: Contents 1 As a unit of measurement 2 In mathematics 3 In education …   Wikipedia

  • Degree — De*gree , n. [F. degr[ e], OF. degret, fr. LL. degradare. See {Degrade}.] 1. A step, stair, or staircase. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] By ladders, or else by degree. Rom. of R. [1913 Webster] 2. One of a series of progressive steps upward or downward,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • degree — [di grē′] n. [ME degre < OFr degré, degree, step, rank < VL * degradus < degradare: see DEGRADE] 1. any of the successive steps or stages in a process or series 2. a step in the direct line of descent [a cousin in the second degree] 3.… …   English World dictionary

  • degree — In Sheridan s The Rivals (1775), we find the assertion Assuredly, sir, your father is wrath to a degree, meaning ‘your father is extremely cross’. The use survived in more florid English into the 20c and was accepted by Fowler (1926) ‘however… …   Modern English usage

  • degree — early 13c., from O.Fr. degré (12c.) a step (of a stair), pace, degree (of relationship), academic degree; rank, status, position, said to be from V.L. *degradus a step, from L.L. degredare, from L. de down (see DE (Cf. de )) + gradus step (see… …   Etymology dictionary

  • degree — ► NOUN 1) the amount, level, or extent to which something happens or is present. 2) a unit of measurement of angles, equivalent to one ninetieth of a right angle. 3) a unit in a scale of temperature, intensity, hardness, etc. 4) an academic rank… …   English terms dictionary

  • dégréé — dégréé, ée (dé gré é, ée) part. passé. Un vaisseau dégréé …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • degree — of freedom degree of polymerization …   Mechanics glossary

  • degree — [n1] unit of measurement amount, amplitude, caliber, dimension, division, expanse, extent, gauge, gradation, grade, height, intensity, interval, length, limit, line, link, mark, notch, period, plane, point, proportion, quality, quantity, range,… …   New thesaurus

  • degree — noun 1 measurement of angles VERB + DEGREE ▪ rotate, spin, turn ▪ I turned the wheel 90 degrees, PREPOSITION ▪ through … degrees ▪ …   Collocations dictionary


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