extort


extort
ex·tort /ik-'stȯrt/ vt [Latin extortus, past participle of extorquere to remove by twisting, obtain by force, from ex- out + torquere to twist]: to obtain (as money) from a person by force, intimidation, or undue or unlawful use of authority or power
ex·tort·er n
ex·tor·tive /-'stȯr-tiv/ adj

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

extort
I verb blackmail, coerce, compel, compel by intimidation, compel by threat, constrain by force, draw out by compulsion, draw out by force, elicit by threat, exact, exact by force, exprimere, extorquere, force, gain by wrongful methods, gain wrongfully, obtain by compulsion, obtain in an unlawful manner, obtain unlawfully, victimize, wrest, wring associated concepts: kidnapping foreign phrases:
- Accipere quid ut justlttam facias, non est tarn accipere quam extorquere. — The acceptance of anything as a reward for doing justice is extorting rather than accepting
II index acquire (secure), coerce, deprive, exact, force (coerce), impose (enforce), press (constrain), prey, toll (exact payment)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


extort
v.
To get something from someone else through force, threats, or fear.
n.
extortion

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


extort
v. To wrongfully take something of value from another by the threat of force or other coercive measure.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


extort
To compel or coerce, as in a confession or information, by any means serving to overcome the other's power of resistance, thus making the confession or admission involuntary. To gain by wrongful methods; to obtain in an unlawful manner, as in to compel payments by means of threats of injury to person, property, or reputation. To exact something wrongfully by threatening or putting in fear. The natural meaning of the word extort is to obtain money or other valuable things by compulsion, by actual force, or by the force of motives applied to the will, and often more overpowering and irresistible than physical force.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


extort
To compel or coerce, as in a confession or information, by any means serving to overcome the other's power of resistance, thus making the confession or admission involuntary. To gain by wrongful methods; to obtain in an unlawful manner, as in to compel payments by means of threats of injury to person, property, or reputation. To exact something wrongfully by threatening or putting in fear. The natural meaning of the word extort is to obtain money or other valuable things by compulsion, by actual force, or by the force of motives applied to the will, and often more overpowering and irresistible than physical force.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Extort — Ex*tort , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Extorted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Extorting}.] [L. extortus, p. p. of extorquere to twist or wrench out, to extort; ex out + torquere to turn about, twist. See {Torsion}.] 1. To wrest from an unwilling person by physical… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • extort — ex‧tort [ɪkˈstɔːt ǁ ɔːrt] verb [transitive] LAW to illegally force someone to give you money by threatening them: extort money from/​out of somebody • Smith was arrested on suspicion of having extorted property and money from at least 18 clients …   Financial and business terms

  • Extort — Ex*tort , v. i. To practice extortion. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Extort — Ex*tort , p. p. & a. [L. extortus. p. p.] Extorted. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • extort — 1520s (as a pp. adj. from early 15c.), from L. extortus, pp. of extorquere (see EXTORTION (Cf. extortion)). Related: Extorted; extorting …   Etymology dictionary

  • extort — extract, *educe, elicit, evoke Analogous words: draw, drag, *pull: compel, *force, constrain, oblige, coerce: exact, *demand, require …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • extort — [v] cheat; blackmail bleed*, bully, clip, coerce, demand, educe, elicit, evince, exact, extract, fleece, force, get, gouge, hold up*, ice*, make pay through nose*, milk*, obtain, pinch, pull one’s leg*, put screws to*, put the arm on*, secure,… …   New thesaurus

  • extort — ► VERB ▪ obtain by force, threats, or other unfair means. DERIVATIVES extorter noun extortion noun extortioner noun extortionist noun extortive adjective. ORIGIN Latin extorquere, from torquere twist …   English terms dictionary

  • extort — [ek stôrt′, ikstôrt′] vt. [< L extortus, pp. of extorquere, to twist or turn out < ex , out + torquere, to twist: see TORT] to get (money, etc.) from someone by violence, threats, misuse of authority, etc.; exact or wrest (from) SYN.… …   English World dictionary

  • extort — verb a) To wrest from an unwilling person by physical force, menace, duress, torture, or any undue or illegal exercise of power or ingenuity; to wrench away (from); to tear away; to wring (from); to exact; as, to extort contributions from the… …   Wiktionary


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