euthanasia
eu·tha·na·sia /ˌyü-thə-'nā-zhə/ n: the act or practice of killing or permitting the death of hopelessly sick or injured persons in a relatively painless way for reasons of mercy – called also mercy killing;
eu·tha·na·sic /-'nā-zik, -sik/ adj

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

euthanasia
n.
Mercy killing; painlessly killing someone who is suffering from a painful incurable disease or who is in a coma and has no hope of ever waking up.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


euthanasia
'a happy death', the killing of another person to comply with the wishes of the victim (express or implied) where the victim is incurably ill and in pain or some miserable state. It is illegal in the UK: Att. Gen. v . Able [1984] QB 795. The House of Lords, in Alvedale NHS Trust v . Bland 1993 TLR 47, held that it was not unlawful for doctors to withdraw life-supporting medical treatment from a patient in a persistent vegetative state who had no prospect of improvement, even where it was known that death would result in a matter of weeks. The patient was not brain-stem dead. Nonetheless, it was pointed out forcefully that this was not euthanasia, which is actually causing death to avoid or end suffering.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


euthanasia
Bringing about the death of a person who is terminally ill and, usually, suffering. Sometimes called mercy killing.
Category: Divorce & Family Law → Elder Care & Seniors
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Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


euthanasia
n. The process of terminating the life of another by merciful or painless means, to prevent further suffering.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


euthanasia
(Greek, good death.)
The term normally implies an intentional termination of life by another at the explicit request of the person who wishes to die. Euthanasia is generally defined as the act of killing an incurably ill person out of concern and compassion for that person's suffering.
It is sometimes called mercy killing, but many advocates of euthanasia define mercy killing more precisely as the ending of another person's life without his or her request. Euthanasia, on the other hand, is usually separated into two categories: passive euthanasia and active euthanasia.
In many jurisdictions, active euthanasia can be considered murder or manslaughter, whereas passive euthanasia is accepted by professional medical societies, and by the law under certain circumstances.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


euthanasia
[Greek, good death.] The term normally implies an intentional termination of life by another at the explicit request of the person who wishes to die. Euthanasia is generally defined as the act of killing an incurably ill person out of concern and compassion for that person's suffering.
 
It is sometimes called mercy killing, but many advocates of euthanasia define mercy killing more precisely as the ending of another person's life without his or her request. Euthanasia, on the other hand, is usually separated into two categories: passive euthanasia and active euthanasia.
 
In many jurisdictions, active euthanasia can be considered murder or manslaughter, whereas passive euthanasia is accepted by professional medical societies, and by the law under certain circumstances.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

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  • EUTHANASIA — EUTHANASIA, term denoting the action of inducing gentle and easy death, first used by the British moral historian W.E.H. Lecky in 1869. Among advocates of this measure to terminate the life of sufferers from incurable or painful disease are many… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Euthanasia LP — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Euthanasia LP Álbum de Ca$his Publicación 2009 Grabación 2009 …   Wikipedia Español

  • Euthanasia — • From Greek eu, well, and thanatos, death, easy, painless death Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Euthanasia     Euthanasia     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Euthanasia — Eu tha*na si*a . [NL., fr. Gr. ?; e y^ well + ? death, ?, ?, to die: cf. F. euthanasie.] 1. An easy death; a mode of dying to be desired. An euthanasia of all thought. Hazlitt. [1913 Webster] The kindest wish of my friends is euthanasia.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • euthanasia — c.1600, from Gk. euthanasia an easy or happy death, from eu good (see EU (Cf. eu )) + thanatos death (see THANATOLOGY (Cf. thanatology)). Sense of legally sanctioned mercy killing is first recorded in English 1869 …   Etymology dictionary

  • euthanasia — euthanasia, active/passive …   Philosophy dictionary

  • euthanasia — [n] mercy killing assisted suicide, putting out of misery*; concept 252 …   New thesaurus

  • euthanasia — ► NOUN ▪ the painless killing of a patient suffering from an incurable disease or in an irreversible coma. ORIGIN from Greek eu well + thanatos death …   English terms dictionary

  • euthanasia — [yo͞o΄thə nā′zhə, yo͞o΄thə nā′zhē ə, yo͞o΄thə nā′zē ə] n. [Gr, painless, happy death < eu (see EU ) + thanatos, death: see DULL] 1. Now Rare an easy and painless death 2. act or practice of causing death painlessly, so as to end suffering:… …   English World dictionary

  • Euthanasia — For mercy killings performed on animals, see Animal euthanasia. Part of a series on …   Wikipedia

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