as is
I adjective as it is, as it stands, as offered, as presented, as represented, as seen, as shown, as things are, in its present condition, in its present form, in its present state, in the same way, just the same, without warranty associated concepts: as is contract, caveat emptor, without covenants or warranties II index a priori

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


as is
adj.
In the present condition; goods sold “as is” are delivered in the condition in which they were when the buyer inspected them before purchase.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


as is
A term in a sales contract providing that the buyer agrees to take property, such as a house, horse, auto, or appliance in its present condition, without the right to complain if it is faulty. However, the buyer must have had the right to reasonable inspection of the property, so that he or she has a chance to find any obvious deficiency before purchase.
Category: Personal Finance & Retirement
Category: Real Estate & Rental Property

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


as is
adj. In the condition it presently exists or as found on inspection immediately prior to purchase, even if damaged or defective, without modification and without any express or implied warranties. When referring to a sale of goods that were sold as is, based on an inspection of a sample, the goods delivered must be of the same type and quality or better than the sample was immediately prior to its inspection.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


as is
A term used to describe a sales transaction in which the seller offers goods in their present, existing condition to prospective buyers.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


as is
A term used to describe a sales transaction in which the seller offers goods in their present, existing condition to prospective buyers.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

as is
adj.
   description of a condition in a sales contract in which the buyer agrees to take the property (e.g. house, horse, auto, or appliance) without the right to complain if it is faulty. However, the buyer must have had the right to reasonable inspection, so that he/she has a chance to find any obvious deficiency. Intentionally hiding a known defect will make a seller liable for fraud and serves to cancel the "as is" provision.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

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