privacy


privacy
pri·va·cy n: freedom from unauthorized intrusion: state of being let alone and able to keep certain esp. personal matters to oneself see also expectation of privacy, invasion of privacy; privacy interest at interest 3b, right of privacy; griswold v. connecticut and roe v. wade in the important cases section

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

privacy
I noun concealment, confidentiality, confidentialness, delitescence, disassociation, dissociation, evasion, evasiveness, intimacy, isolation, obscurity, penetralia, privateness, quietude, retirement, retreat, seclusion, secrecy, secretiveness, separateness, separation, solitariness, solitude, solitudo, voluntary exile, withdrawal associated concepts: invasion of privacy, right of privacy II index concealment, confidence (relation of trust), obscuration

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


privacy
n.
The state of being left alone, free from observation of and interference with personal relations.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


privacy
the tort or delict (unrecognised formally in the UK) of infringing a person's right to be left alone. Although the notion of privacy is protected by law in many systems in the continental Europe and in the USA, there is no recognised tort in English law of invasion of privacy. Scotland arguably recognises a verbal injury called convicium, which makes it a delict to bring a person into public ridicule and hatred, but this in itself would not cover a polite and neutral exposure of personal details. Scots law also recognises interference with liberty. The Human Rights Act 1998 provides a right to respect for a person's private and family life. See defamation and confidence.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


privacy
The right to be free of unnecessary public scrutiny, or to be let alone.
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


privacy
In constitutional law, the right of people to make personal decisions regarding intimate matters; under the common law, the right of people to lead their lives in a manner that is reasonably secluded from public scrutiny, whether such scrutiny comes from a neighbor's prying eyes, an investigator's eavesdropping ears, or a news photographer's intrusive camera; and in statutory law, the right of people to be free from unwarranted drug testing and electronic surveillance.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


privacy
In constitutional law, the right of people to make personal decisions regarding intimate matters; under the common law, the right of people to lead their lives in a manner that is reasonably secluded from public scrutiny, whether such scrutiny comes from a neighbor's prying eyes, an investigator's eavesdropping ears, or a news photographer's intrusive camera; and in statutory law, the right of people to be free from unwarranted drug testing and electronic surveillance.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

privacy
n.
   the right to be free of unnecessary public scrutiny or to be let alone. Once a person is a "public figure" or involved in newsworthy events, the right to privacy may evaporate.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms: