res gestae


res gestae
res ges·tae /'rās-'ges-ˌtī, 'rēz-'jes-ˌtē/ n pl [Latin, things done, deeds]
1: the acts, facts, circumstances, statements, or occurrences that form the environment of a main act or event and esp. of a crime and are so closely connected to it that they constitute part of a continuous transaction and can serve to illustrate its character
the decedent's statement...was too far removed in time and place to be admissible as part of the res gestaeLynch v. State, 552 N.E.2d 56 (1990)
2 a: an exception or set of exceptions to the hearsay rule that permits the admission of hearsay evidence regarding excited utterances or declarations relating to mental, emotional, or bodily states or sense impressions of a witness or participant compare dying declaration and spontaneous declaration at declaration 2c, excited utterance
◇ Res gestae in common law encompassed a variety of different exceptions to the hearsay rule, but most modern rules of evidence (as the Federal Rules of Evidence) have abandoned use of res gestae and specify the different exceptions on their own terms.
b: an exception to the exclusionary rule against the use of other crimes as evidence that permits such use when another crime is closely enough connected to the one in dispute as to form part of a continuous episode or transaction

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

res gestae
n.
(Latin) Things done; a spontaneous remark or declaration made by a person just after an event but before he or she has had a chance to manufacture a falsehood, which is held to be inherently reliable.
See also spontaneous exclamation

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


res gestae
See hearsay.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


res gestae
(rayz-jest-eye) All circumstances surrounding and connected with a happening. Thus, the res gestae of a crime includes the immediate area and all occurrences and statements immediately before and after the crime.
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


res gestae
n. Latin Things done. Either the events at issue or other things, such as utterances, that are contemporaneous with the res gestae; spontaneous statements or exclamations made by the participants, perpetrators, victims, or onlookers at or immediately following the event, be it criminal or the subject of litigation. As present-sense impressions, they are excluded from the hearsay rule.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


res gestae
(Latin: Things done.)
Secondhand statements considered trustworthy for the purpose of admission as evidence in a lawsuit when repeated by a witness because they were made spontaneously and concurrently with an event.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


res gestae
I
[Latin, Things done.] Secondhand statements considered trustworthy for the purpose of admission as evidence in a lawsuit when repeated by a witness because they were made spontaneously and concurrently with an event.
II The facts or things done which form the basis for a litigation action.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

res gestae
[rayz jest-tie]
n.
   from Latin for "things done," it means all circumstances surrounding and connected with a happening. Thus, the res gestae of a crime includes the immediate area and all occurrences and statements immediately after the crime. Statements made within the res gestae of a crime or accident may be admitted in court even though they are "hearsay" on the basis that spontaneous statements in those circumstances are reliable.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Res Gestae — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Les Res gestae divi Augusti (Actes du divin Auguste), testament politique d Auguste. Les Res gestae (Actes), ouvrage d histoire en trente et un livres d… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Res Gestae. — (Indiana State Bar Assoc.) …   Black's law dictionary

  • res gestae — [jes′tē, jes′tā, jes′tī΄] pl.n. [L, lit., things done, deeds] Law facts that are so closely connected with the occurrence in question as to be considered a part of it, and are thus admissible as evidence …   English World dictionary

  • Res gestae — This article is for the legal term Res Gestae . For the article on the record of the accomplishments of the first Roman emperor, Augustus, see the article for Res Gestae Divi Augusti. Res gestae (Latin things done ) is a term found in substantive …   Wikipedia

  • Res Gestae — Mit dem lateinischen Begriff Res Gestae (Tatenbericht) kann gemeint sein: Res Gestae Divi Augusti, der bekannte Tatenbericht des ersten römischen Kaisers Augustus das Geschichtswerk des Ammianus Marcellinus die so genannten res gestae divi… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Res gestae — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Les Res gestae divi Augusti (Actes du divin Auguste), testament politique d Auguste. Les Res gestae (Actes), ouvrage d histoire en trente et un livres d… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • res gestae — /reez jes tee, rays / 1. things done; accomplishments; deeds. 2. Law. the acts, circumstances, and statements that are incidental to the principal fact of a litigated matter and are admissible in evidence in view of their relevant association… …   Universalium

  • Res gestae — Res Res (r?z), n.; pl. {Res}. [L.] A thing; the particular thing; a matter; a point. [1913 Webster] {Res gest[ae]} [L., things done] (Law), the facts which form the environment of a litigated issue. Wharton. {Res judicata} [L.] (Law), a thing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • res gestae — res ges•tae [[t]ˈriz ˈdʒɛs ti, ˈreɪs[/t]] n. pl. 1) things done; accomplishments; deeds 2) law Law. the acts, circumstances, and statements that are incidental to the principal fact of a litigated matter and are admissible in evidence • Etymology …   From formal English to slang

  • res gestae — noun plural Etymology: Latin Date: 1616 things done; especially the facts that form the environment of a litigated issue and are admissible in evidence …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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