resisting arrest


resisting arrest
n.
Using physical efforts to avoid being arrested by a police officer.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


resisting arrest
The crime of using physical force (no matter how slight in the eyes of most law enforcement officers) to prevent arrest, handcuffing, or taking the accused to jail. It is also called "resisting an officer" (which can include interfering with a peace officer's attempt to keep the peace) and is sometimes referred to merely as "resisting."
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


resisting arrest
n. Physically opposing or obstructing a police officer who is attempting to make a legal arrest. The resistance is deemed to be an assault and battery upon the arresting officer, and in no case can be regarded as self defense.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.

resisting arrest
n.
   the crime of using physical force (no matter how slight in the eyes of most law enforcement officers) to prevent arrest, handcuffing and/or taking the accused to jail. It is also called "resisting an officer" (but that can include interfering with a peace officer's attempt to keep the peace) and is sometimes referred to merely as "resisting."

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Resisting arrest — is a term used to describe a criminal charge against an individual who has committed at least one of the following acts:*Eluding a police officer who is attempting to arrest the individual *Using or threatening to use force against an officer… …   Wikipedia

  • resisting arrest —    while in custody    Police usage to explain the wrongful wounding or killing of a prisoner:     I like it better you get a slug in the guts resisting arrest. (Chandler, 1939)    See also shot while trying to escape …   How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • resisting arrest — noun physical efforts to oppose a lawful arrest; the resistance is classified as assault and battery upon the person of the police officer attempting to make the arrest • Topics: ↑law, ↑jurisprudence • Hypernyms: ↑assault, ↑battery, ↑assault and… …   Useful english dictionary

  • resisting arrest — The crime of obstructing or opposing a police officer making an arrest. See, e.g., Model Penal Code, No. 242.2; N.J.S.A. 2C:29 2 …   Black's law dictionary

  • arrest — ar·rest 1 /ə rest/ n [Middle French arest, from arester to stop, seize, arrest, ultimately from Latin ad to, at + restare to stay]: the restraining and seizure of a person whether or not by physical force by someone acting under authority (as a… …   Law dictionary

  • Arrest — For other uses, see Arrest (disambiguation). Lucy Parsons after her arrest for rioting during an unemployment protest at Hull House in Chicago, Illinois. 1915 …   Wikipedia

  • arrest — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun ADJECTIVE ▪ false, wrongful ▪ arbitrary ▪ mass ▪ citizen s ▪ He grabbed the intruder by the arm and said, ‘I am m …   Collocations dictionary

  • resisting an officer — In criminal law, the offense of obstructing, opposing, and endeavoring to prevent (with or without actual force) a peace officer in the execution of a writ or in the lawful discharge of his duty while making an arrest or otherwise enforcing the… …   Black's law dictionary

  • Resisting unlawful arrest — is a possible justification for breaking the law. Defendants who use this defense are arguing that they should not be held guilty for a crime, since the actions taken were intended to protect them from an unlawful arrest.Many courts will not… …   Wikipedia

  • Citizen's arrest — A citizen s arrest is an arrest made by a person who is not acting as a sworn law enforcement official.[1] In common law jurisdictions, the practice dates back to medieval Britain and the English common law, in which sheriffs encouraged ordinary… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.