robbery


robbery
rob·bery n pl -ber·ies [Anglo-French robberie roberie, from Old French, from rober to take something away from a person by force]: the unlawful taking away of personal property from a person by violence or by threat of violence that causes fear: larceny from the person or immediate presence of another by violence or threat of violence and with intent to steal
aggravated robbery: robbery committed with aggravating factors (as use of a weapon, infliction of bodily injury, or use of an accomplice)
armed robbery: robbery committed by a person armed with a dangerous or deadly weapon
simple robbery: robbery that does not involve any aggravating factors

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

robbery
I noun depredation, felonious taking, felonious taking of the property of another, holdup, larceny by force, latrocinium, piracy, plundering, rapina, spoliatio, stealing, theft, thievery II index burglary, housebreaking, plunder, spoliation, theft

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


robbery
n.
Theft involving the use of force; the felony of taking money or property from another person through the use of force or threats that make the victim afraid.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


robbery
the crime of using force or fear of force to commit a theft. The force may be before, during or after the robbery. Technically, the force must be against the person and not the property, making 'bag-snatching' problematic.
In Scots criminal law, robbery is theft committed by way of personal violence or intimidation. Violence to the person after the theft is not robbery, as where something is stolen and the attempts of the owner to recover the property are resisted.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


robbery
The crime of directly taking property (including money) from a person (victim) through force, threat, or intimidation. Robbery is a felony, punishable by a term in state or federal prison. Armed robbery involves the use of gun or other weapon, such as a knife or club, and under most state laws carries a stiffer penalty than robbery by merely taking. Compare: burglary, embezzlement, shoplifting
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


robbery
n. The illegal stealing or taking of another's property from that person or another by violence or by threat of violence; aggravated larceny. The personal threat of violence and implicit fear on the part of the victim are essential in order to distinguish robbery from burglary.
@ armed robbery
Robbery committed by a felon carrying a dangerous weapon, whether or not that weapon is actually used or even shown. The crime is tried as any robbery would be in most states, but the weapon serves to bump up the severity of the crime.
=>> robbery.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


robbery
The taking of money or goods in the possession of another, from his or her person or immediate presence, by force or intimidation.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


robbery
I
The taking of money or goods in the possession of another, from his or her person or immediate presence, by force or intimidation.
II Felonious taking of another's property, from his or her person or immediate presence and against his or her will, by means of force or fear. (See larceny.)

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

robbery
n.
   1) the direct taking of property (including money) from a person (victim) through force, threat or intimidation. Robbery is a felony (crime punishable by a term in state or federal prison). "Armed robbery" involves the use of a gun or other weapon which can do bodily harm, such as a knife or club, and under most state laws carries a stiffer penalty (longer possible term) than robbery by merely taking.
   2) a term improperly used to describe thefts, including burglary (breaking and entering) and shoplifting (secret theft from the stock of a store), expressed: "We've been robbed."
   See also: theft

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Robbery — Robbery, Assault Battery Saltar a navegación, búsqueda «Robbery, Assault Battery» Canción de Genesis álbum A Trick of the Tail Publicación 20 febrero 1976 …   Wikipedia Español

  • Robbery — Rob ber*y, n.; pl. {Robberies}. [OF. roberie.] 1. The act or practice of robbing; theft. [1913 Webster] Thieves for their robbery have authority When judges steal themselves. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) The crime of robbing. See {Rob}, v. t., 2 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • robbery — UK US /ˈrɒbəri/ noun [C or U] (plural robberies) LAW ► the crime of stealing from somewhere or someone: »He committed several robberies. »a bank robbery …   Financial and business terms

  • robbery — (n.) c.1200, from O.Fr. roberie, from rober (see ROB (Cf. rob)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • robbery — *larceny, *theft, burglary …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • robbery — [n] stealing break in, burglary, caper, embezzlement, felony, heist*, hit, holdup*, job, larceny, looting, mortal sin, mugging, purse snatching, stickup*, theft, thievery, unlawful act, wrongdoing; concept 192 …   New thesaurus

  • robbery — ► NOUN (pl. robberies) 1) the action of robbing a person or place. 2) informal unashamed swindling or overcharging …   English terms dictionary

  • robbery — [rä′bər ē] n. pl. robberies [ME roberie < OFr: see ROB & ERY] 1. act or practice of robbing 2. Law the felonious taking of personal property in the possession or immediate presence of another by the use of violence or intimidation SYN. THEFT …   English World dictionary

  • Robbery — This article is about the crime. For the 1967 film, see Robbery (1967 film). For the 1897 film, see Robbery (1897 film). For the Teena Marie album, see Robbery (album). Holdup redirects here. For the contract bridge playing technique, see Hold up …   Wikipedia

  • robbery — Felonious taking of money, personal property, or any other article of value, in the possession of another, from his person or immediate presence, and against his will, accomplished by means of force or fear. People v. Eddy, 123 Cal.App.2d 826,… …   Black's law dictionary


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