expletive


expletive
I noun addition, anathema, bad language, blaspheming, curse, denunciation, ecphonesis, embellishment, execration, foul invective, foul language, imprecation, injection, insertion, interjection, interpolation, irreverence, malediction, outcry, profane interjection, rhetorical phrase, rhetorical word, scurrility, strong language, swearing, unnecessary addition, unnecessary inclusion II index blasphemy, expendable, imprecation, needless, surplus, unnecessary

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006

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  • Expletive — Ex ple*tive, a. [L. expletivus, from expletus, p. p. of explere to fill up; ex out+plere to fill, akin to plenus full: cf. F. expl[ e]tif. See {Full}.] Filling up; hence, added merely for the purpose of filling up; superfluous. Expletive imagery …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • expletive — is an adjective and a noun: both are pronounced ik splee tiv, with the stress on the second syllable. The primary meaning is ‘filling out a sentence, line of verse, etc.’, and the noun denotes a word that does this, typically in verse, without… …   Modern English usage

  • expletive — [eks′plətôr΄ēeks′plə tiv] n. [LL expletivus, serving to fill < L expletus, pp. of explere, to fill < ex , out, up + plere, to fill: see FULL1] 1. an oath or exclamation, esp. an obscenity 2. a word, phrase, etc. not needed for the sense but …   English World dictionary

  • Expletive — Ex ple*tive, n. A word, letter, or syllable not necessary to the sense, but inserted to fill a vacancy; an oath. [1913 Webster] While explectives their feeble aid to join, And ten low words oft creep in one dull line. Pope. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • expletive — [n] swear word; exclamation curse, cuss, cuss word, interjection, oath; concept 275 …   New thesaurus

  • expletive — ► NOUN ▪ an oath or swear word. ORIGIN originally denoting a word used to fill out a sentence: from Latin expletivus, from explere fill out …   English terms dictionary

  • Expletive — The word expletive is currently used in three senses: syntactic expletives, expletive attributives, and bad language .The word expletive comes from the Latin verb explere , meaning to fill , via expletivus , filling out . It was introduced into… …   Wikipedia

  • expletive — {{11}}expletive (adj.) mid 15c., from L. expletivus (see EXPLETIVE (Cf. expletive) (n.)). {{12}}expletive (n.) 1610s, originally a word or phrase serving to fill out a sentence or metrical line, from M.Fr. explétif (15c.) and directly from L.L.… …   Etymology dictionary

  • expletive — [17] Originally, an expletive word was simply one used to ‘fill up’ a line of verse, to complete its metrical pattern (expletive comes from Latin explētus, the past participle of explēre ‘fill out’, a compound formed from the prefix ex ‘out’ and… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • expletive — [17] Originally, an expletive word was simply one used to ‘fill up’ a line of verse, to complete its metrical pattern (expletive comes from Latin explētus, the past participle of explēre ‘fill out’, a compound formed from the prefix ex ‘out’ and… …   Word origins


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