tenure

tenure
ten·ure /'ten-yər/ n [Anglo-French, feudal holding, from Old French teneüre, from Medieval Latin tenitura, ultimately from Latin tenēre to hold]
1: the act, manner, duration, or right of holding something
tenure of office; specif: the manner of holding real property: the title and conditions by which property is held
freehold tenure
2: a status granted to a teacher usu. after a probationary period that protects him or her from dismissal except for reasons of incompetence, gross misconduct, or financial necessity
te·nur·ial /te-'nyu̇r-ē-əl/ adj
te·nur·ial·ly /-ə-lē/ adv

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

tenure
I noun duration, holding, occupancy, occupation, period, possessio, possidere, regime, term associated concepts: tenure in office foreign phrases:
- Tenura est pactio contra communem feudi naturam ac rationem, in contractu interposita. — Tenure is a compact contrary to the common nature and reason of the fee
put into a contract. II index domain (land owned), duration, enjoyment (use), occupancy, occupation (possession), ownership, period, phase (period), seisin, tenancy, term (duration), time, title (right)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


tenure
n.
(1) A right to hold property; the condition of holding property.
(2) The time that a person spends in a position or an office.
(3) A state of guaranteed permanent employment awarded to professors, teachers, and a few other employees who have worked for an institution a specified period of time.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


tenure
the holding or occupying of property, especially realty, in return for services rendered, etc. See, for example feudal system.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


tenure
1) The right to occupy or hold property, sometimes only for a set period of time.
2) The right to hold a position indefinitely, absent serious misconduct or inability to perform the duties of the position. For example, federal judges have lifetime tenure, and professors who are granted tenure generally have indefinite job security.
3) The length of time for which a person has held a particular position. For example, "During my tenure on the Board of Directors, the company has doubled in size."
Category: Real Estate & Rental Property

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


tenure
n.
1 An ancient hierarchical system of land possession or holding in subordination to a superior.
2 The status afforded teachers and professors, long considered a cornerstone of academic freedom of protection against dismissal without adequate cause.
3 A general legal protection of a long-term relationship, such as employment.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


tenure
A right, term, or mode of holding or occupying something of value for a period of time.
In feudal law, the principal mode or system by which a person held land from a superior in exchange for the rendition of service and loyalty to the grantor.
The status given to an educator who has satisfactorily completed teaching for a trial period and is, therefore, protected against summary dismissal by the employer.
A length of time during which an individual has a right to occupy a public or private office.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


tenure
A right, term, or mode of holding or occupying something of value for a period of time.
 
In feudal law, the principal mode or system by which a person held land from a superior in exchange for the rendition of service and loyalty to the grantor.
 
The status given to an educator who has satisfactorily completed teaching for a trial period and is, therefore, protected against summary dismissal by the employer.
 
A length of time during which an individual has a right to occupy a public or private office.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

tenure
n.
   1) in real property, the right to possess the property.
   2) in employment contracts, particularly of public employees like school teachers or professors, a guaranteed right to a job (barring substantial inability to perform or some wrongful act) once a probationary period has passed.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Синонимы:
(lands and tenements) / , , , , (for the time)


См. также в других словарях:

  • Tenure — commonly refers to life tenure in a job and specifically to a senior academic s contractual right not to have their position terminated without just cause. Academic tenureUnder the tenure systems adopted as internal policy by many universities… …   Wikipedia

  • tenure — [ tənyr ] n. f. • teneüre 1156; de tenir ♦ Féod. Mode de concession d une terre; cette terre elle même. Tenure noble, féodale, concédée par un seigneur à un autre (⇒ fief) . Tenure roturière, servile. ♢ Relation de dépendance (d un fief par… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • tenure — ten‧ure [ˈtenjə, jʊə ǁ jər] noun [uncountable] 1. the period of time when someone has an important job or position: • During his four year tenure as president, the firm s annual revenue rose dramatically. 2. the right to stay permanently in a job …   Financial and business terms

  • tenure — 1. (te nu r ) s. f. 1°   Terme de féodalité. Mode suivant lequel on tenait une terre. •   L imperfection de cette tenure [ne pouvoir disposer du bien tenu en mainmorte] n est pas le seul vice qui affecte l héritage mainmortable, VOLT. Pol. et lég …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Tenure — Ten ure, n. [F. tenure, OF. teneure, fr. F. tenir to hold. See {Tenable}.] 1. The act or right of holding, as property, especially real estate. [1913 Webster] That the tenure of estates might rest on equity, the Indian title to lands was in all… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tenure — early 15c., holding of a tenement, from Anglo Fr. and O.Fr. tenure a tenure, estate in land (13c.), from O.Fr. tenir to hold, from V.L. *tenire, from L. tenere to hold (see TENET (Cf. tenet)). The sense of condition or fact of holding a status,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • tenure — s. f. Garantia de manutenção do posto de trabalho, mesmo em caso de reorganização de uma instituição (ex.: contrato com tenure).   ‣ Etimologia: inglês tenure, posse, título de posse …   Dicionário da Língua Portuguesa

  • tenure — ► NOUN 1) the conditions under which land or buildings are held or occupied. 2) the holding of an office. ● security of tenure Cf. ↑security of tenure ORIGIN Old French, from Latin tenere to hold …   English terms dictionary

  • tenure — [n] time in position of responsibility administration, clamp, clasp, clench, clinch, clutch, dynasty, grasp, grip, hold, holding, incumbency, occupancy, occupation, ownership, possession, proprietorship, regime, reign, residence, security,… …   New thesaurus

  • tenure — [ten′yər, ten′yoor] n. [ME < MFr < tenir, to hold: see TENANT] 1. the act or right of holding property, an office, a position, etc. 2. the length of time, or the conditions under which, something is held 3. the status of holding one s… …   English World dictionary


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