theft


theft
theft n [Old English thiefth]: larceny; broadly: a criminal taking of the property or services of another without consent
◇ Theft commonly encompasses by statute a variety of forms of stealing formerly treated as distinct crimes.
grand theft: theft of property or services whose value exceeds a specified amount or of a specified kind of property (as an automobile)
◇ Grand theft is a felony.
identity theft: the unauthorized use of another's means of identification (as name or social security number) for the purpose of commiting theft or another crime
petty theft: theft of property or services whose value is below a specified amount – called also petit theft;
◇ Petty theft is a misdemeanor but may be aggravated by prior convictions.

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

theft
I noun burglary, embezzlement, felonious taking, filchery, fraudulent taking, furtum, larceny, looting, misappropriation, peculation, pilferage, pilfering, purloining, purloinment, robbery, stealing, swindling, thievery, wrongful taking associated concepts: theft of services foreign phrases:
- Contrectatio rei allenae animo furando, est furtum. — The touching or removing of another's property, with an intention of stealing, is theft.
II index burglary, conversion (misappropriation), embezzlement, housebreaking, larceny, misappropriation, plunder, robbery, spoliation

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


theft
n.
The act of taking something that belongs to someone else, without the owner’s permission and with no intention of returning it; stealing; see also larceny, steal

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


theft
in English law, now defined in statutory terms by the Theft Act 1968 as the dishonest appropriation of property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it. The law has however been complicated by semantic arguments, leading the Court of Appeal to say that the law is in urgent need of reform to make cases understandable to juries: R v . Hallam; R v . Blackburn [1994] TLR 306. Wheel-clamping is not theft in England (contrary to the position in Scotland) because there is not the intention to permanently deprive: Arthur and Another v. Anker [1995] TLR 632.
In Scots criminal law, the felonious taking or appropriation of the property of another without his consent and (in most cases) with the intention to deprive him of it permanently. The felonious taking is sometimes known as amotio. It has been held that temporary deprivation is sufficient in some cases. A nefarious purpose in the taking may be enough. Wheel-clamping has been held to be theft, even although the vehicle is not moved by the clamper: Black v . Carmichael 1992 SLT 897.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


theft
The generic term for all crimes in which a person intentionally takes personal property of another without permission or consent and with the intent to convert it to the taker's use (including potential sale). In many states, when the value of the property taken is low (for example, less than $500) the crime is "petty theft" and a misdemeanor; but it is "grand theft" and a felony for larger amounts. Theft is synonymous with "larceny." Although robbery (taking by force), burglary (taking after entering unlawfully), and embezzlement (stealing from an employer) are all commonly thought of as theft, they are distinguished by the means and methods used, and are separately designated as specific types of crimes in criminal charges and statutory punishments. (See also: larceny, robbery, burglary, embezzlement)
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


theft
n.
1 Larceny; the unlawful expropriation of someone else's property with the intent of keeping it from its rightful owner.
2 In its broadest sense, any example or act of stealing, which includes burglary, embezzlement, false pretenses, fraud, and larceny. While larceny is generally categorized as petty or grand depending on the value of the goods taken, theft is generally categorized by the type of property stolen.
@ identity theft
The misappropriation of another's confidential and personal information such that the one taking such data can use such information to pass as the other by submission of credit documents, forging of identification cards, etc.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


theft
A criminal act in which property belonging to another is taken without that person's consent.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


theft
A criminal act in which property belonging to another is taken without that person's consent.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

theft
n.
   the generic term for all crimes in which a person intentionally and fraudulently takes personal property of another without permission or consent and with the intent to convert it to the taker's use (including potential sale). In many states, if the value of the property taken is low (for example, less than $500) the crime is "petty theft," but it is "grand theft" for larger amounts, designated misdemeanor or felony, respectively. Theft is synonymous with "larceny." Although robbery (taking by force), burglary (taken by entering unlawfully) and embezzlement (stealing from an employer) are all commonly thought of as theft, they are distinguished by the means and methods used and are separately designated as those types of crimes in criminal charges and statutory punishments.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • theft — /theft/, n. 1. the act of stealing; the wrongful taking and carrying away of the personal goods or property of another; larceny. 2. an instance of this. 3. Archaic. something stolen. [bef. 900; ME; OE thefth, theofth; see THIEF, TH1; c. ON thyfth …   Universalium

  • theft — [θeft] noun [countable, uncountable] the crime of stealing or an act of stealing something: • An employee was fired for theft. • Your property should be insured against theft. theft of • Thefts of property from cars rose 24%. iˈdentity ˌtheft… …   Financial and business terms

  • Theft — • The secret taking of another s property against the reasonable will of that other Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Theft     Theft      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • theft — theft, larceny, robbery, burglary mean the act or crime of stealing, though they have differences in legal application. The same differences in implications and applications are observable in the agent nouns thief, larcener or larcenist, robber,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • theft — [θeft] n [: Old English; Origin: thiefth] 1.) [U] the crime of stealing →↑thief, burglary ↑burglary, robbery ↑robbery ▪ Car theft is on the increase. ▪ an arrest for petty theft (=stealing small things) ▪ Three men were charged with attemp …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Theft — Theft, n. [OE. thefte, AS. [thorn]i[ e]f[eth]e, [thorn][=y]f[eth]e, [thorn]e[ o]f[eth]e. See {Thief}.] 1. (Law) The act of stealing; specifically, the felonious taking and removing of personal property, with an intent to deprive the rightful… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • theft — [theft] n. [ME thefte < OE thiefth: see THIEF & TH1] the act or an instance of stealing; larceny SYN. THEFT is the general term and LARCENY the legal term for the unlawful or felonious taking away of another s property without his or her… …   English World dictionary

  • theft — [ θeft ] noun count or uncount ** the crime of stealing. Someone who commits this crime is called a thief: There have been a lot of thefts recently. theft of: He was charged with the theft of club funds …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • theft — theft; theft·bote; …   English syllables

  • theft — (n.) O.E. þeofð (W.Saxon þiefð), from P.Gmc. *theubitho (Cf. O.Fris. thiufthe, O.N. þyfð), from *theubaz thief (see THIEF (Cf. thief)) + suffix itha (cognate with L. itatem) …   Etymology dictionary