mutuality of obligations


mutuality of obligations
A necessary feature of the relationship between an employer and an employee is the existence of mutually binding legal obligations. For an employment contract to exist the employer must be obliged to pay and the employee must be obliged to do the work.

Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.

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