Wednesbury unreasonableness


Wednesbury unreasonableness
A standard of unreasonableness used in assessing an application for judicial review of a public authority's decision. A reasoning or decision is Wednesbury unreasonable (or irrational) if it is so unreasonable that no reasonable person acting reasonably could have made it (Associated Provincial Picture Houses Ltd v Wednesbury Corporation (1947) 2 All ER 680). The test is a different (and stricter) test than merely showing that the decision was unreasonable.
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Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.

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