defeasible remainder
A vested remainder that can be destroyed if a specific condition occurs. For example, "To Jorge, unless he gets divorced." Jorge has a vested remainder, but it's also a defeasible remainder because it can be taken away from him if he gets divorced.
Category: Wills, Trusts & Estates

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • defeasible — de·fea·si·ble /di fē zə bəl/ adj: subject to or capable of being annulled or made void a defeasible interest his rights are not defeasible by agreement J. D. Calamari and J. M. Perillo Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • remainder subject to divestment — See: defeasible remainder Category: Wills, Trusts & Estates Nolo’s Plain English Law Dictionary. Gerald N. Hill, Kathleen Thompson Hill. 2009 …   Law dictionary

  • defeasible — Subject to be defeated, annulled, revoked, or undone upon the happening of a future event or the performance of a condition subsequent, or by a conditional limitation. An estate which is not absolute, i.e., one which is determinable or subject to …   Black's law dictionary

  • defeasible — Subject to be defeated, annulled, revoked, or undone upon the happening of a future event or the performance of a condition subsequent, or by a conditional limitation. An estate which is not absolute, i.e., one which is determinable or subject to …   Black's law dictionary

  • Remainder (law) — Property law Part of …   Wikipedia

  • indefeasible remainder — A vested remainder that cannot be undone. Compare: defeasible remainder Category: Wills, Trusts & Estates Nolo’s Plain English Law Dictionary. Gerald N. Hill, Kathleen Thompson Hill. 2009 …   Law dictionary

  • Future interest — This article is about the legal concept of future interests in property. For the actuarial valuation of future streams of income, see Future interests (actuarial science) …   Wikipedia

  • Fee simple — is an estate in land in common law. It is the most common way real estate is owned in common law countries, and is ordinarily the most complete ownership interest that can be had in real property short of allodial title, which is often reserved… …   Wikipedia

  • Doctrine of worthier title — Property law Part of t …   Wikipedia

  • fee — n [Middle English, fief, from Old French fé fief, ultimately from a Germanic word akin to Old High German fehu cattle] 1: an inheritable freehold estate in real property; esp: fee simple compare leasehold; life estate at estate …   Law dictionary

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